Saturday December 15, 2018

An Orange a Day May Ward off Stroke Risk

On average, the people who had a stroke had depleted levels of vitamin C, while those who had not had a stroke had normal levels of the vitamin

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An Orange a Day May Ward off Stroke Risk
An Orange a Day May Ward off Stroke Risk. Pixabay
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Eating foods that contain vitamin C may reduce your risk of the most common type of hemorrhagic stroke, says a study.

Vitamin C is found in fruits and vegetables such as oranges, papaya, peppers, broccoli and strawberries.

Hemorrhagic stroke is less common than ischemic stroke, but is more often deadly.

The study involved 65 people who had experienced an intra-cerebral hemorrhagic stroke, or a blood vessel rupture inside the brain. They were compared to 65 healthy people.

Participants were tested for the levels of vitamin C in their blood. Forty-one percent of cases had normal levels of vitamin C, 45 percent showed depleted levels of vitamin C and 14 percent were considered deficient of the vitamin.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

On average, the people who had a stroke had depleted levels of vitamin C, while those who had not had a stroke had normal levels of the vitamin.

“Our results show that vitamin C deficiency should be considered a risk factor for this severe type of stroke, as were high blood pressure, drinking alcohol and being overweight in our study,” said study author Stéphane Vannier with Pontchaillou University Hospital in Rennes, France.

Also Read: Facing Dry Eye Syndrome? Tips to Cure it

Vannier added that vitamin C appeared to have other benefits like creating collagen, a protein found in bones, skin and tissues.

Vitamin C deficiency has also been linked to heart disease. (IANS)

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Exercise May help to Reduce Stroke Risk in Menopausal Women

For the study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, researchers examined 3,003 midlife women undergoing the transition to menopause

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Exercise may cut the risk of stroke in menopausal women. Pixabay

Mid-aged women transitioning to menopause may be able to lower their risk of developing stroke, heart disease and Type-2 diabetes if they exercise more or eat a low calorie diet, suggests a research.

The study showed that physically active women were less likely to get incidents of metabolic syndrome than inactive women.

Metabolic syndrome describes a cluster of risk factors that increase the chances of developing heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Genetic factors, excess body fat, and lack of exercise can add to its development.

Patients with metabolic syndrome are diagnosed when they have three or more of these risk factors — large amount of abdominal body fat, low (“good”) cholesterol, high levels of fat in the blood, high blood pressure, and high blood glucose.

Exercise is crucial for everyone. Pixabay

“Previous studies have largely focused on cardiovascular disease and Type-2 diabetes in postmenopausal women. This study is unique because it focuses on an earlier stage in women’s lives, the menopausal transition in midlife, to potentially prevent such diseases from occurring,” said Jennifer S. Lee, Associate Professor at the Stanford Health Care in the US.

For the study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, researchers examined 3,003 midlife women undergoing the transition to menopause.

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They identified patterns of cardiometabolic risk and found central obesity to be the most common factor for causing metabolic syndrome.

“Discovering which modifiable factors like physical activity and a lower calorie diet are more common in midlife women who recover from metabolic syndrome, in this study, could better inform what preventive strategies to consider in women earlier in their lives,” Lee noted. (IANS)