Monday October 22, 2018

An Orange a Day May Ward off Stroke Risk

On average, the people who had a stroke had depleted levels of vitamin C, while those who had not had a stroke had normal levels of the vitamin

0
//
25
An Orange a Day May Ward off Stroke Risk
An Orange a Day May Ward off Stroke Risk. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Eating foods that contain vitamin C may reduce your risk of the most common type of hemorrhagic stroke, says a study.

Vitamin C is found in fruits and vegetables such as oranges, papaya, peppers, broccoli and strawberries.

Hemorrhagic stroke is less common than ischemic stroke, but is more often deadly.

The study involved 65 people who had experienced an intra-cerebral hemorrhagic stroke, or a blood vessel rupture inside the brain. They were compared to 65 healthy people.

Participants were tested for the levels of vitamin C in their blood. Forty-one percent of cases had normal levels of vitamin C, 45 percent showed depleted levels of vitamin C and 14 percent were considered deficient of the vitamin.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

On average, the people who had a stroke had depleted levels of vitamin C, while those who had not had a stroke had normal levels of the vitamin.

“Our results show that vitamin C deficiency should be considered a risk factor for this severe type of stroke, as were high blood pressure, drinking alcohol and being overweight in our study,” said study author Stéphane Vannier with Pontchaillou University Hospital in Rennes, France.

Also Read: Facing Dry Eye Syndrome? Tips to Cure it

Vannier added that vitamin C appeared to have other benefits like creating collagen, a protein found in bones, skin and tissues.

Vitamin C deficiency has also been linked to heart disease. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Playing Golf May Boost Longevity And Cut Stroke Risk

The sport needs to be more inclusive and welcoming of people from all walks of life and ethnic backgrounds, the researchers said

0
Golf
Play golf to boost longevity, cut stroke risk. Pixabay

Want a long life? Playing golf regularly can boost longevity as well as reduce the risk factors for heart disease and stroke, a panel of international experts has claimed, while stressing on the need to make the sport more inclusive.

The panel, led by the University of Edinburgh, showed that playing golf, which is good for both the mind and body, can also boost strength and balance in older adults.

The sport is also associated with good mental health and improving the overall health of those with disabilities.

It could be because golf is sociable and gets people outdoors to connect with nature.

It can also provide moderate intensity aerobic physical activity, and its health benefits are greatest for players (and spectators) who walk round the course rather than opt for a golf cart, researchers including Andrew D Murray, from Edinburgh’s Physical Activity for Health Research Centre, explained.

While the risk of injury while playing golf is moderate, compared with other sports, golfers may be more at risk of skin cancer, he noted.

Golf
Golf (Representational image). Pixabay

The researchers suggested that golfers should aim to play for 150 minutes per week.

Players should do warm-up or strengthening exercises to cut the risk of injury and use sun-cream and wear collared shirts or blouses to minimise the risk of skin cancer,  Murray recommended.

In the study appearing in British Journal of Sports Medicine, the panel drew on a systematic review of the available published evidence (342 eligible studies) and discussions among an international working group of 25 experts in public health and health policy, and industry leaders.

Also Read- Xiaomi Expands Its Offline Presence in India, With Smart TV

While around 60 million people play golf at least twice a year, the sport is often perceived as expensive, male dominated, difficult to learn, and not a game for the young or those on the lower rungs of the social ladder.

The sport needs to be more inclusive and welcoming of people from all walks of life and ethnic backgrounds, the researchers said. (IANS)

Next Story