Monday December 16, 2019

Orange Juice, Leafy Vegetables May Prevent Memory Loss in Older Age

A total of 55 per cent of the participants had good thinking and memory skills, 38 per cent had moderate skills, and seven per cent had poor thinking and memory skills

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Orange juice, leafy greens may preserve memory in older men. Pixabay

Men who eat leafy greens, dark orange and red vegetables, berries and drink orange juice may be at a lower risk of developing memory loss in older age, according to a study.

The findings showed that men who ate larger amounts of fruits and vegetables 20 years earlier were less likely to develop thinking and memory problems, whether or not they kept eating larger amounts of fruits and vegetables later.

Men who consumed the most vegetables were 34 per cent less likely to develop poor thinking skills than the men who consumed the least amount of vegetables.

Men who drank orange juice every day were 47 per cent less likely to develop poor thinking skills than the men who drank less than one serving per month. This association was mainly observed for regular consumption of orange juice among the oldest men, the researchers found.

“One of the most important factors in this study is that we were able to research and track such a large group of men over a 20-year period of time, allowing for very telling results,” said Changzheng Yuan from Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston.

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Leafy vegetables. Pixabay

“Our studies provide further evidence dietary choices can be important to maintain your brain health,” Yuan added.

The study, published in the journal Neurology, looked at 27,842 men with an average age of 51 who were all health professionals.

Participants also took subjective tests of their thinking and memory skills at least four years before the end of the study, when they were an average age of 73.

Also Read- Instagram Testing Re-arrangement of Features, Icons

A total of 55 per cent of the participants had good thinking and memory skills, 38 per cent had moderate skills, and seven per cent had poor thinking and memory skills.

However, the study does not show that eating fruits and vegetables and drinking orange juice reduces memory loss; it only shows a relationship between them, the researchers noted. (IANS)

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Here’s Why Your Grandmothers Dislike Wearing A Fitness Band

Grandmas may hate wearing smart watches not just to be tech savvy

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Grandmoms dislikes fitness band
There are many reasons as to why Older ladies do not prefer wearing a fitness band. Pixabay

If your grandmother does not like to wear a fitness band or a smart watch, there are deeper reasons than just being tech-savvy. According to researchers, older adults wish to remain active together in a group, not competing with their peers while being in the park.

While counterintuitive, engaging in competition with family and friends decreases the odds of long-term use among older adults, perhaps because they feel it’s demotivating, according to researchers from Michigan State University.

And wanting to lose weight, become more active and monitor health doesn’t seem to influence length of use either. But technological savviness does.

“For older adults, motivation is about partnership and collaboration, such as walking together,” said Anastasia Kononova, assistant professor of advertising. “It’s about being active together, not competing.”

Fitness band
Older adults dislike wearing fitness band as the physical appearance of such devices doesn’t matter to them. Pixabay

The researchers conducted a survey of adults age 65 and older to explore factors associated with long-term use — longer than six months — of wearable activity trackers.

They looked at usage patterns, socioeconomic factors, health status and activity levels.

The study, published in the journal Telemedicine and e-HEALTH, found older adults are likely to use trackers longer if they use a wider variety of functions to track their health and activity levels.

Examples of such functions include tracking calories burned, distance, heart rate, mood, sleep time, steps, etc.

Other factors determining long-term use: being female, being well-educated, wearing every day, exercising regularly and not having chronic health conditions.

Also Read- For U.S. Military Veterans, Apple Providing Health Records On iPhones

“For starters, manufacturers should incorporate activities specific to an older population, such as swimming and gardening, into trackers,” Kononova said.

Like younger users, physical appearance of trackers is important, so big and bulky doesn’t work.

“Wearable activity trackers have the potential to improve older adults’ health, yet many adopters don’t use them on a long-term basis,” said Lin Li, a doctoral candidate studying health and technology who led the study. (IANS)