Wednesday October 17, 2018

Origins of Valentine’s Day: rooted in violence and blood

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Valentine's day
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See what Amazon has to offer you on Valentine’s Day: http://amzn.to/1Pv7lRG

Today is February 14 and it is Valentine’s Day. Call it an ill effect of market driven economy or ongoing globalization, Valentine’s day has become an occasion of global celebrations. Even the cultures and communities that have otherwise no links to Valentine’s Day have also adopted it. Take for example, India: a country with glorious traditions, a leader in spirituality and sanatana dharma. has fallen to commercial forces of Valentine’s Day. Celebrating Valentine’s Day is considered a marker of modernity. However, majority of people do not even know about its origin and what exactly does it stand for.

Let us go into a bit of history and delve into origin and journey of Valentine’s Day. The article taken from National Public Radio (USA) tells us that in ancient Roman times, February 13 to 15 were observed as the feast of Lupercalia. It adds: “The men sacrificed a goat and a dog, then whipped women with the hides of the animals they had just slain”.

Sometime along the way, Roman kings executed 2 men named valentine on February 14 on two different days of history. The Church however gave a religious tone to these executions, transforming them to Saints, hence the name St Valentine. Also, the Normans celebrated Galatin’s Day around the same time. Galatin literally means ‘lover of women’ and over time, it was likely confused with Valentine’s day.

With Hallmark company of USA starting printing cards for this day in 1913, the commercial onslaught began and the World has not been same since then. Today Valentine’s Day churns out a 18 Billion dollar business.

To read the whole article and educate yourself on the dark side of Valentin’s Day, go to NPR.

See what Amazon has to offer you on Valentine’s Day: http://amzn.to/1Pv7lRG

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WhatsApp message to wrong number got this man his Date

"I had given up on love and then Michael sent that message and literally landed in my life," Dahlbeck added

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Whatsapp, Pixabay

Love is beautiful… Perhaps a little more so when someone finds it without putting much of an effort. But can it blossom even from an innocent WhatsApp message sent to a wrong number? Michael Evangelou from Colliers Wood in south London would say ‘yes’.

Evangelou, 44, sent a message, which read “Girls Trip”, to a number he thought was his own as a reminder to see the film at the cinema. It sparked a conversation with a stranger and ultimately led to their marriage, independent.co.uk reported on Monday.

The recipient happened to be Lina Dahlbeck, 37, from Morden in south London, who sent a reply reply saying, “Hi! Girls trip? Who’s this please? I’m guessing this was intended for another Lina”.

A wrong Whatsapp message led to this couple’s love story. Youtube

The pair struck up a conversation as they attempted to figure out exactly what had happened. Despite never meeting, the two chatted for most of the day before arranging to meet for a drink later that night.

“We started chatting back and forth. I think if I wasn’t single I wouldn’t have continued the chat,” Dahlbeck was quoted as saying. And just four hours after that WhatsApp message, they were on a date.

“We were convinced it was fate that had brought us together,” Dahlbeck said. The couple married on December 7 and in March, they are jetting off to Dubai where Dahlbeck aims to launch a make-up school.

Also Read: Top 5 Songs for Week Ending March 17

“Most of our friends thought we were a bit nuts,” Dahlbeck said, adding that parents of both of them were delighted at the prospect of marriage. The couple insists that their story is a lesson to others not to give up on love.

“I had given up on love and then Michael sent that message and literally landed in my life,” Dahlbeck added. “My story gives hope to everyone: never give up,” she added. IANS

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