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Orlando Shooter Omar Saddiqui Mateen’s Ex-wife says he was Mentally Unstable and Ill

Gunman's ex wife Yusufiy said her husband treated her like a hostage and kept her from seeing her family

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Orlando Shooter's Ex-wife Says He Was Mentally Unstable. Image source: Reuters
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  • Yusufiy said Mateen was “normal” at the beginning of their marriage, but soon he started getting angry seemingly out of nowhere
  • She said her husband treated her like a hostage and kept her from seeing her family
  • Mateen’s father, Mir Seddique said that his son may have been motivated by homophobia and not by his Muslim faith

Mentally unstable and ill is what the ex-wife of Orlando nightclub gunman Omar Saddiqui Mateen said about him while she characterized their brief marriage as “hell.”

On late Sunday, June 12, Sitora Yusufiy spoke to reporters about the four months she was married to the man responsible for the worst mass killing in U.S. history.

Yusufiy said Mateen was “normal” at the beginning of their marriage, but soon he started getting angry seemingly out of nowhere.

She said Mateen became physically abusive, flying into rages and beating her for little reason, such as if the laundry was not done when he came home from work.

She said her husband treated her like a hostage and kept her from seeing her family. She said with her family’s help, she finally was able to get away one day, leaving all her belongings behind.

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Yusufiy said despite his bad temper, the news that it was her ex-husband who was behind a mass murder “shook me off the ground,” and that this was something she would never have expected.

Homophobia as motive?

An undated photo from a social media account of Omar Mateen, who Orlando Police have identified as the suspect in the mass shooting at a gay nighclub in Orlando, Florida, U.S., June 12, 2016. Omar Mateen Image source: REUTERS
An undated photo from a social media account of Omar Mateen, who Orlando Police have identified as the suspect in the mass shooting at a gay nighclub in Orlando, Florida, U.S., June 12, 2016. Omar Mateen Image source: REUTERS

Mateen’s father, Mir Seddique, told the NBC television network that his son may have been motivated by homophobia and not by his Muslim faith.

“This had nothing to do with religion,” Seddique said as he recalled a recent incident in downtown Miami, another Florida city.

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“He saw two men kissing each other in front of his wife and kid and he got very angry,” the father said. “They were kissing each other and touching each other and he said, ‘Look at that. In front of my son they are doing that.’ And then we were in the men’s bathroom and men were kissing each other.”

Seddique apologized to the victims of the shooting. He said relatives “weren’t aware of any action he is taking. We are in shock like the whole country.” (VOA)

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Get Married to Have Better Bones!

Specifically, the authors used hip and spine bone-density measurements and other data to examine the relationship between bone health and marriage in 294 men and 338 women

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Get Married to Have Better Bones!
Get Married to Have Better Bones! Pixabay

Are you 25 or older? Getting married won’t be a bad idea for the health of your bones, especially spinal ones.

Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), found evidence that men who married when they were younger than 25 had lower bone strength than men who married for the first time at a later age.

“This is the first time that marriage has been linked to bone health,” said senior author Carolyn Crandall, professor of medicine at UCLA.

“There is very little known about the influence of social factors – other than socio-economic factors – on bone health,” Crandall added.

Among men who first married prior to turning 25, the researchers found a significant reduction in spine bone strength for each year they were married before that age.

Also, men in stable marriages or marriage-like relationships who had never previously divorced or separated had greater bone strength than men whose previous marriages had fractured, the researchers said.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

And those in stable relationships also had stronger bones than men who never married, said the study published in the journal Osteoporosis International.

The researchers used data from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study, which recruited participants between the ages 25 and 75 in 1995-96.

Participants from that study were re-interviewed in 2004-05 (MIDUS II).

Also Read: Sex Hormone Levels Linked to Heart Disease in Post-Menopausal Women

Specifically, the authors used hip and spine bone-density measurements and other data to examine the relationship between bone health and marriage in 294 men and 338 women.

They also took into consideration other factors that influence bone health, such as medications, health behaviours and menopause.

“The associations between marriage and bone health were evident in the spine but not the hip, possibly due to differences in bone composition,” Crandall said.

“Very early marriage was detrimental in men, likely because of the stresses of having to provide for a family,” said study co-author Arun Karlamangla, a professor of medicine in the geriatrics division at the Geffen School. (IANS)