Wednesday March 27, 2019
Home Lead Story With Ovarian ...

With Ovarian Cancer Deaths Set to Spike by 67%, AI to Rescue: Study

However, the scans cannot give clinicians detailed insight into patients’ likely overall outcomes or on the likely effect of a therapeutic intervention

0
//
Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

With the incidence of ovarian cancer likely to increase by 55 per cent in another 15 years or so, researchers have created an artificial intelligence (AI) software to help best treat ovarian cancer that will pave the way for personalised medicine and expedite relief, a new study says.

The mathematical software tool — TEXLab — can also predict what treatment might be most effective for patients with the World Ovarian Cancer Coalition predicting that deaths will likely increase by 67 per cent by 2035 due to this particular cancer.

The technology can be used to identify patients who are unlikely to respond to standard treatments and offer alternatives as ovarian cancer is the sixth most common cancer in women in the UK that usually strikes after menopause or those with a family history of the disease.

Early detection of the disease could improve survival rates, the study noted.

“Long-term survival rate for patients with advanced ovarian cancer is poor despite advancements in treatments. There is an urgent need for new ways,” said lead author Eric Aboagye, Professor at Imperial College London.

For the study, researchers used the software to identify the aggressiveness of tumours in CT scans and tissue samples from 364 women with ovarian cancer.

The patients were then given a score known as Radiomic Prognostic Vector (RPV) which indicates how severe the disease is, ranging from mild to severe.

Cancer patient
Cancer patient.

The findings, published in Nature Communications, showed that the software was up to four times more accurate for predicting deaths from ovarian cancer than standard methods.

In addition, five per cent of patients with high RPV scores had a survival rate of less than two years, results showed.

High RPV was also associated with chemotherapy resistance and poor surgical outcomes, suggesting that RPV can be used as a potential bio-marker to predict how patients would respond to treatments.

“Our technology is able to give clinicians more detailed and accurate information on how the patients are likely to respond to different treatments, which could enable them to make better and more targeted treatment decisions,” said Aboagye.

Also Read- AI Can Help Improve Understanding of Earth Science

Doctors as of now diagnose ovarian cancer in a number of ways, including a blood test followed by a CT scan that uses X-rays and a computer to create detailed pictures of the ovarian tumour.

This helps clinicians know how far the disease has spread and determines the type of treatment patients receive, such as surgery and chemotherapy.

However, the scans cannot give clinicians detailed insight into patients’ likely overall outcomes or on the likely effect of a therapeutic intervention. (IANS)

Next Story

Threat of AI Displacing Jobs is Real, Says Telecom Secretary

On aggregate, the employability for new-age jobs is on average 1.7 per cent, showed the findings based on more than 170,000 Indian engineering students

0
The enterprise solutions major has integrated SAP CoPilot with the
"A tectonic shift is happening in AI. Nearly 85 per cent of enterprises globally will use AI in some form or the other by 2020.

While digitisation has delivered great benefits to the country, the threat of automation and Artificial Intelligence (AI) displacing jobs is real, Telecom Secretary Aruna Sundararajan said on Monday.

“Adoption of digital technology has proved to be a great democratiser and leveller in India, especially in doing away with many hierarchies in the Indian economy. But digital is also throwing up as many challenges. There are no easy answers to them,” Sundararajan said, while delivering the keynote address at a conference on “future of the digital economy” here.

“There are various estimates about the rate at which jobs are becoming irreverent – from 10 per cent to a high of 70 per cent. So this threat is real,” she said while referring the rise of AI.

With dangers of job losses looming large, can providing universal basic income be the answer?

“The idea of providing universal basic income is gaining ground because a lot of Silicon Valley leaders are pushing for it,” she said.

Participating at a separate panel discussion, Sanjeev Bikchandani, Co-Founder of Info Edge which runs the job portal Naukri.com, said that there will be no large scale job losses due to AI.

AI has the potential to increase India's annual growth.
AI has the potential to increase India’s annual ggrowth.Pixabay“Some jobs will definitely go. But this happens all the time with new technology arriving. Similar questions were raised when computers were introduced in India. AI will create new industries,” he said at the conference co-organised by Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER) and Data Catalyst, a non-profit organisation.

 

But do Indians have the skill set for the new jobs that may be created by the new industries?

According to a new report released last week by job skills assessments company Aspiring Minds, over 80 per cent Indian engineers are unemployable for any job in the knowledge economy.

Also Read- Motorola Launches Moto G7, Motorola One in India

A mere three per cent engineers have new-age technological skills in areas like AI, Machine Learning, Data Science and mobile development, the report said.

On aggregate, the employability for new-age jobs is on average 1.7 per cent, showed the findings based on more than 170,000 Indian engineering students. (IANS)