Saturday January 19, 2019

Ovarian Cancer Risks Cut in Half With a New Birth Control Pill: Study

Previous research had shown that the older products, containing higher levels of oestrogen and older progestogens, were tied to reduced ovarian cancer risk.

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Contraceptives, Wikimedia commons

New types of combined birth control pills — containing both lower doses of oestrogens and newer progestogens — may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer among young women, says a study.

The study, published in the journal The BMJ, showed that this positive effect strengthened with longer periods of use and persisted for several years after stopping.

“The reduced risk seems to persist after stopping use, although the duration of benefit is uncertain,” the study said.

At least 100 million women worldwide use hormonal contraception every day.

Ovarian Cancer
The study found that genes on the X-chromosome get potentially passed down through the father to his daughter, thus increasing the risk of ovarian cancer in girls. Wikimedia Commons

For the study, the researchers from University of Aberdeen in Scotland and the University of Copenhagen in Denmark analysed data for nearly 1.9 million Danish women aged 15-49 years between 1995 and 2014.

Women were categorised as never users (no record of being dispensed hormonal contraception), current or recent users (up to one year after stopping use), or former users (more than one year after stopping use) of different hormonal contraceptives.

Most (86 per cent) of the hormonal contraceptive use related to combined oral products.

The researchers found that the number of cases of ovarian cancer were highest in women who had never used hormonal contraception (7.5 per 100,000 person years), whereas among women who had ever used hormonal contraception, the number of cases of ovarian cancer were 3.2 per 100,000 person years.

Ovarian Cancer
At least 100 million women worldwide use hormonal contraception every day. . (IANS)

The reduced risk for combined products was seen with nearly all types of ovarian cancer, and there was little evidence of important differences between products containing different types of progestogens.

“Based on our results, contemporary combined hormonal contraceptives are still associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer in women of reproductive age, with patterns similar to those seen with older combined oral products,” the study authors said.

Also Read: High Immunity Protein At Birth Cuts Childhood Malaria Risk

Previous research had shown that the older products, containing higher levels of oestrogen and older progestogens, were tied to reduced ovarian cancer risk.

But it was not known whether the newer contraceptives carried the same benefit. (IANS)

Next Story

Keep A Sleep Track During Pregnancy

Understanding the role of maternal sleep may help us identify interventions that would put us in a better position to advise women

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Pregnancy, Breast Cancer
Keep a check pregnancy check.

Sleeping more than nine hours per night during pregnancy may be associated with late stillbirth, suggests a new study.

This is because blood pressure reaches its lowest point during sleep which has been linked with foetal growth problems, preterm birth, and stillbirth.

The study, led by a team from the University of Michigan, explored how maternal sleep habits, including lengthy periods of sleep without waking more than once in the night, may be associated with foetal health independent of other risk factors.

Moreover, pregnant women often report waking up and getting up in the middle of the night.Very disruptive sleep has also been associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, including growth restriction and preterm growth.

The safety of domestic violence victims can also be potentially threatened by the discovery of a disposed of the test. Wikimedia Commons
Balanced sleep is important in pregnancy for a healthy baby.

“Our findings add to research indicating that maternal sleep plays a role in foetal well being. Studies aiming to reduce stillbirths should consider maternal sleep as this is a potentially modifiable risk factor,” said lead author Louise O’Brien, researcher at the varsity.

“Understanding the role of maternal sleep may help us identify interventions that would put us in a better position to advise women,” O’Brien added.

Also Read: Understanding the role of maternal sleep may help us identify interventions that would put us in a better position to advise women

For the study, reported in the journal Birth, the team involved 153 women who had experienced a late stillbirth (on or after 28 weeks of pregnancy) within the previous month and 480 women with an ongoing third-trimester pregnancy or who had recently delivered a live born baby during the same period.

Progress in reducing stillbirth deaths has been slow but stillbirth is an urgent global health issue that should be at the centre of more research programmes, the researchers noted. (IANS)