Monday September 23, 2019

Ovarian Cancer Risks Cut in Half With a New Birth Control Pill: Study

Previous research had shown that the older products, containing higher levels of oestrogen and older progestogens, were tied to reduced ovarian cancer risk.

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Contraceptives, Wikimedia commons

New types of combined birth control pills — containing both lower doses of oestrogens and newer progestogens — may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer among young women, says a study.

The study, published in the journal The BMJ, showed that this positive effect strengthened with longer periods of use and persisted for several years after stopping.

“The reduced risk seems to persist after stopping use, although the duration of benefit is uncertain,” the study said.

At least 100 million women worldwide use hormonal contraception every day.

Ovarian Cancer
The study found that genes on the X-chromosome get potentially passed down through the father to his daughter, thus increasing the risk of ovarian cancer in girls. Wikimedia Commons

For the study, the researchers from University of Aberdeen in Scotland and the University of Copenhagen in Denmark analysed data for nearly 1.9 million Danish women aged 15-49 years between 1995 and 2014.

Women were categorised as never users (no record of being dispensed hormonal contraception), current or recent users (up to one year after stopping use), or former users (more than one year after stopping use) of different hormonal contraceptives.

Most (86 per cent) of the hormonal contraceptive use related to combined oral products.

The researchers found that the number of cases of ovarian cancer were highest in women who had never used hormonal contraception (7.5 per 100,000 person years), whereas among women who had ever used hormonal contraception, the number of cases of ovarian cancer were 3.2 per 100,000 person years.

Ovarian Cancer
At least 100 million women worldwide use hormonal contraception every day. . (IANS)

The reduced risk for combined products was seen with nearly all types of ovarian cancer, and there was little evidence of important differences between products containing different types of progestogens.

“Based on our results, contemporary combined hormonal contraceptives are still associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer in women of reproductive age, with patterns similar to those seen with older combined oral products,” the study authors said.

Also Read: High Immunity Protein At Birth Cuts Childhood Malaria Risk

Previous research had shown that the older products, containing higher levels of oestrogen and older progestogens, were tied to reduced ovarian cancer risk.

But it was not known whether the newer contraceptives carried the same benefit. (IANS)

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Walking, A Key Tool Identify The Specific Type of Dementia

Researchers have found that walking may be a key clinical tool in helping doctors accurately identify the specific type of dementia

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health, dementia, walking, Alzheimer
The suffering that comes as a consequence of this disease is enormous. Pixabay

Researchers have found that walking may be a key clinical tool in helping doctors accurately identify the specific type of dementia a patient has.

Published in the Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association, the research have shown that people with Alzheimer’s disease or Lewy body dementia have unique walking patterns that signal subtle differences between the two conditions.

The study also shows that people with Lewy body dementia change their walking steps more – varying step time and length – and are asymmetric when they move, in comparison to those with Alzheimer’s disease.

“The results from this study are exciting as they suggest that walking could be a useful tool to add to the diagnostic toolbox for dementia,” said study lead author Riona McArdle from the Newcastle University in the UK.

“It is a key development as a more accurate diagnosis means that we know that people are getting the right treatment, care and management for the dementia they have,” she added.

For the study, researchers analysed the walk of 110 people, including 29 older adults whose cognition was intact, 36 with Alzheimer’s disease and 45 with Lewy body dementia.

health, dementia, walking, Alzheimer
Dementia is a rapidly growing public health problem throughout the world. VOA

Participants moved along a walkway – a mat with thousands of sensors inside – which captured their footsteps as they walked across it at their normal speed and this revealed their walking patterns.

People with Lewy body dementia had a unique walking pattern in that they changed how long it took to take a step or the length of their steps more frequently than someone with Alzheimer’s disease, whose walking patterns rarely changed.

ALSO READ: Here’s How Kids Learn Hacking Through Their Behaviour

When a person has Lewy body dementia, their steps are more irregular and this is associated with increased falls risk.

Their walking is more asymmetric in step time and stride length, meaning their left and right footsteps look different to each other.

The study found that analysing both step length variability and step time asymmetry could accurately identify 60 per cent of all dementia subtypes – which has never been shown before. (IANS)