Saturday October 20, 2018

Over Exercising Can Result in Poor Mental Health, Reveals a Lancet Study

Doing exercise more than 23 times a month, or exercising for longer than 90 minute sessions is associated with worse mental health

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Over Exercising Can Result in Poor Mental Health. Exercising for more than 90 minutes daily can be harmful. Image: Wikimedia Commons
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Over exercising or exercising addiction does more harm than good.  Engaging in exercises such as cycling, aerobics and gymming for more than three hours a day can worsen mental health than not exercising at all, a study has found.

The study, published in journal The Lancet Psychiatry, found that people who exercised between three and five times a week had better mental health than people who exercised less or more each week.

Conversely, people doing extreme amounts of exercise might have obsessive characteristics which could place them at greater risk of poor mental health, the researchers said.

Over exercising, mental health, exercise addiction
Over exercising: Doing exercise more than 23 times a month, or exercising for longer than 90 minute sessions is associated with worse mental health. Image: Wikimedia Commons

“Previously, people have believed that the more exercise you do, the better your mental health, but our study suggests that this is not the case,” said Adam Chekroud, Assistant Professor at Yale University in the US.

“Doing exercise more than 23 times a month, or exercising for longer than 90 minute sessions is associated with worse mental health,” he added.

Exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, and mortality from all causes, but its association with mental health remains unclear.

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For the study, the team used data from 1.2 million adults across all 50 US states and included all types of physical activity, ranging from childcare, housework, lawn-mowing and fishing to cycling, going to the gym, running and skiing.

Team sports, cycling, aerobics and going to the gym were associated with the biggest reductions — 22.3 per cent, 21.6 per cent, and 20.1 per cent, respectively.

For people who had previously been diagnosed with depression, exercise was associated with 3.75 fewer days of poor mental health. (IANS) 

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Mental Health Issues Are Not Likely to Ruin Teenagers’ Friendships, Says Study

Compared to boys, girls tend to favour extended dyadic exchanges, and so they may respond to submissive behaviour with support and empathy, which may strengthen friendship ties

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Teenagers
Mental health may not ruin teenagers' friendships: Study. Pixabay

Teenagers with similar levels of mental health issues such as anxiety and depression are more likely to remain friends, but dissimilarites can create incidence instability, a new study has found.

“An important takeaway from our study is that children’s personal struggles need not adversely impact their social relationships,” said Brett Laursen, Professor at the Florida Atlantic University (FAU).

“Mental health issues do not necessarily ruin chances of making and maintaining worthwhile friendships,” he added.

Youth who resembled one another were more likely to remain friends from one year to the next.

“Behavioural similarity is tremendously important to a friendship. Shared feelings and shared experiences are the glue that holds a friendship together,” Laursen said.

For the study, published in the Journal of Research on Adolescence, the team included 397 adolescents (194 boys, 203 girls) in 499 same-sex friendships, who were followed from grade seven (median age 13), through to the end of high school in grade 12.

Teenagers
Youth who resembled one another were more likely to remain friends from one year to the next. Pixabay

They examined the degree to which internalising symptoms — anxiety, depression, social withdrawal and submissiveness — predicted the dissolution of teenage friendships.

In most respects, boys and girls did not differ in the factors that predicted friendship instability.

However, one notable exception was — differences on submissiveness increased friendship instability for boys, but decreased friendship instability for girls.

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“Compared with girls, boys are more competitive and confrontational in interactions with friends, suggesting that dissimilarity on submissiveness may be a liability when it comes to the activities that many boys prefer such as sports and games,” Laursen said.

“Compared to boys, girls tend to favour extended dyadic exchanges, and so they may respond to submissive behaviour with support and empathy, which may strengthen friendship ties,” he noted. (IANS)