Sunday November 17, 2019

Over Exercising Can Result in Poor Mental Health, Reveals a Lancet Study

Doing exercise more than 23 times a month, or exercising for longer than 90 minute sessions is associated with worse mental health

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over exercising, mental health , exercising addiction
Over Exercising Can Result in Poor Mental Health. Exercising for more than 90 minutes daily can be harmful. Image: Wikimedia Commons

Over exercising or exercising addiction does more harm than good.  Engaging in exercises such as cycling, aerobics and gymming for more than three hours a day can worsen mental health than not exercising at all, a study has found.

The study, published in journal The Lancet Psychiatry, found that people who exercised between three and five times a week had better mental health than people who exercised less or more each week.

Conversely, people doing extreme amounts of exercise might have obsessive characteristics which could place them at greater risk of poor mental health, the researchers said.

Over exercising, mental health, exercise addiction
Over exercising: Doing exercise more than 23 times a month, or exercising for longer than 90 minute sessions is associated with worse mental health. Image: Wikimedia Commons

“Previously, people have believed that the more exercise you do, the better your mental health, but our study suggests that this is not the case,” said Adam Chekroud, Assistant Professor at Yale University in the US.

“Doing exercise more than 23 times a month, or exercising for longer than 90 minute sessions is associated with worse mental health,” he added.

Exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, and mortality from all causes, but its association with mental health remains unclear.

You may like to read: Obesity During Pregnancy May up Kids’ Risk of Epilepsy

For the study, the team used data from 1.2 million adults across all 50 US states and included all types of physical activity, ranging from childcare, housework, lawn-mowing and fishing to cycling, going to the gym, running and skiing.

Team sports, cycling, aerobics and going to the gym were associated with the biggest reductions — 22.3 per cent, 21.6 per cent, and 20.1 per cent, respectively.

For people who had previously been diagnosed with depression, exercise was associated with 3.75 fewer days of poor mental health. (IANS) 

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Scientists Link ‘Brain Fog’ to Body Illness

The study focused specifically on an area of the brain that is responsible for visual attention

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Illness
This research finding is major step forward in understanding the links between physical, cognitive, and mental health and tells us that even the mildest of Illness may reduce alertness. Pixabay

Scientists have uncovered a possible explanation for the mental sluggishness or mental fatigue that often accompanies Illness.

A team at the University of Birmingham’s Centre for Human Brain Health investigated the link between the mental fog and inflammation — the body’s response to illness.

In a study published in Neuroimage, the team in collaboration with the University of Amsterdam showed that inflammation appears to have a particular negative impact on the brain’s readiness to reach and maintain an alert state.

Scientists have long suspected a link between inflammation and cognition, but it is very difficult to be clear about the cause and effect.

“For example, people living with a medical condition or being very overweight might complain of cognitive impairment, but it’s hard to tell if that’s due to the inflammation associated with these conditions or if there are other reasons,” said senior study author Dr Ali Mazaheri from University of Birmingham.

The study focused specifically on an area of the brain that is responsible for visual attention.

A group of 20 young male volunteers took part and received a salmonella typhoid vaccine that causes temporary inflammation but has few other side effects.

Brain activity was measured while they performed the attention tests.

On a different day, either before or after, they received an injection with water (a placebo) and did the same attention tests.

Illness
Scientists have uncovered a possible explanation for the mental sluggishness or mental fatigue that often accompanies Illness. Pixabay

On each test day, they were unaware of which injection they had received.

The results showed that inflammation specifically affected brain activity related to staying alert, while the other attention processes appeared unaffected by inflammation.

“This research finding is major step forward in understanding the links between physical, cognitive, and mental health and tells us that even the mildest of illnesses may reduce alertness,” noted Professor Jane Raymond.

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The next step for the team will be to test the effects of inflammation on other areas of brain function such as memory. (IANS)