Saturday May 25, 2019

Over Exercising Can Result in Poor Mental Health, Reveals a Lancet Study

Doing exercise more than 23 times a month, or exercising for longer than 90 minute sessions is associated with worse mental health

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over exercising, mental health , exercising addiction
Over Exercising Can Result in Poor Mental Health. Exercising for more than 90 minutes daily can be harmful. Image: Wikimedia Commons

Over exercising or exercising addiction does more harm than good.  Engaging in exercises such as cycling, aerobics and gymming for more than three hours a day can worsen mental health than not exercising at all, a study has found.

The study, published in journal The Lancet Psychiatry, found that people who exercised between three and five times a week had better mental health than people who exercised less or more each week.

Conversely, people doing extreme amounts of exercise might have obsessive characteristics which could place them at greater risk of poor mental health, the researchers said.

Over exercising, mental health, exercise addiction
Over exercising: Doing exercise more than 23 times a month, or exercising for longer than 90 minute sessions is associated with worse mental health. Image: Wikimedia Commons

“Previously, people have believed that the more exercise you do, the better your mental health, but our study suggests that this is not the case,” said Adam Chekroud, Assistant Professor at Yale University in the US.

“Doing exercise more than 23 times a month, or exercising for longer than 90 minute sessions is associated with worse mental health,” he added.

Exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, and mortality from all causes, but its association with mental health remains unclear.

You may like to read: Obesity During Pregnancy May up Kids’ Risk of Epilepsy

For the study, the team used data from 1.2 million adults across all 50 US states and included all types of physical activity, ranging from childcare, housework, lawn-mowing and fishing to cycling, going to the gym, running and skiing.

Team sports, cycling, aerobics and going to the gym were associated with the biggest reductions — 22.3 per cent, 21.6 per cent, and 20.1 per cent, respectively.

For people who had previously been diagnosed with depression, exercise was associated with 3.75 fewer days of poor mental health. (IANS) 

Next Story

Rising Awareness Among Indians Towards Mental Health

The healthcare map, which highlights key consumer healthcare trends, concerns and behaviour, has been compiled from thousands of searches and appointments, by over 13 crore patients, across more than 50 cities and over 250 specialties, in 2018.

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A World Health Organisation (WHO) report states that 7.5 per cent of the Indian population suffers from some form of mental concern or disorder. Pixabay

While mental health has often remained a widely ignored topic and a taboo in the Indian society, a new report shows over 80 per cent rise in the number of people seeking help for mental health issues, especially in tier-2 cities.

According to domestic digital healthcare platform Practo’s annual healthcare map, there has been 82 per cent increase in the appointments with psychologists, psychiatrists and psychotherapists in tier-2 cities — Indore, Kanpur, Nagpur, Jaipur, Vishakapatnam, Bhopal, Chandigarh, Lucknow, Coimbatore, Ahmedabad and Patna.

People in these cities sought help mostly for depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), marriage counselling, stress, de-addiction and anger management among others.

mental health
“This indicates that unhealthy lifestyle habits, long working hours and work-life imbalance are taking a toll on people and their mental health,” the Practo report said.
Pixabay

“It is a common belief that mental issues are mainly arising in metro cities owing to the stressful lifestyles. However, the non-metro cities are also in immediate need for access to mental healthcare,” Aparna Mahesh, psychotherapist at Practo, told IANS.

“The sharp increase in the number of physical appointments with psychologists, psychiatrists and psychotherapists in these towns and cities clearly indicates that Indians beyond metros are seeking timely help to address their concerns rather than ignoring or self-medicating,” Mahesh added.

In tier-1 cities — Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru, Pune, Chennai, Kolkata and Hyderabad — a 24 per cent increase was seen in the appointments with psychologists, psychiatrists and psychotherapists.

A World Health Organisation (WHO) report states that 7.5 per cent of the Indian population suffers from some form of mental concern or disorder.

 

mental health
“It is a common belief that mental issues are mainly arising in metro cities owing to the stressful lifestyles. However, the non-metro cities are also in immediate need for access to mental healthcare,” Aparna Mahesh, psychotherapist at Practo, told IANS.
Pixabay

“This indicates that unhealthy lifestyle habits, long working hours and work-life imbalance are taking a toll on people and their mental health,” the Practo report said.

Further, it was found that Indians visited their doctors 3.2 times a year in 2018, up from 2.7 times in 2017. Gynaecology, dermatology and paediatrics emerged as top three specialties where most visits occurred.

Also Read: Indian Consumers Cautious of Data Misuse Through Technological Devices

This is, however, lower than Japan where patients visited doctors 13 times or the US where visits to doctors were a little over four times in 2018.

The healthcare map, which highlights key consumer healthcare trends, concerns and behaviour, has been compiled from thousands of searches and appointments, by over 13 crore patients, across more than 50 cities and over 250 specialties, in 2018. (IANS)