Saturday December 7, 2019

Being Overweight Before the Age of 40 Can Increase Risk of Cancer in Adults

"The risk increased by 64 per cent for male participants and 48 per cent for females," Bjorge added

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Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

Researchers have found that being overweight before the age of 40 could increase the risk of various cancers in adults.

“Obesity is an established risk factor for several cancers. In this study, we have focused on the degree, timing and duration of overweight and obesity in relation to cancer risk,” said study author Tone Bjorge, Professor at University of Bergen in Norway.

For the findings, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, the research team wanted to find out how adult overweight (BMI over 25) and obesity (BMI over 30) increase the risk of different types of cancer.

The researchers used data for 2,20,000 individuals from the Me-Can study, with participants from Norway, Sweden and Austria.

Data from health examinations, including information on height and weight, were linked to data from national cancer registries.

Obesity
An overweight woman sits on a chair in Times Square in New York, May 8, 2012. VOA

According to the researchers, 27,881 individuals were diagnosed with cancer during follow-up, of which 9,761 (35 per cent) were obesity-related.

The study showed that if you were overweight before age 40, the risk of developing cancer increases by: 70 per cent for endometrial cancer, 58 per cent for male renal-cell cancer, 29 per cent for male colon cancer and 15 per cent for all obesity-related cancers (both sexes).

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Obese participants (BMI over 30) at the first and second health examination had the highest risk of developing obesity-related cancer, compared to participants with normal BMI.

“The risk increased by 64 per cent for male participants and 48 per cent for females,” Bjorge added. (IANS)

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New Way To Treat Pancreatic Cancer is Here: Researchers

The Decoded mechanism acts efficiently in other types of cancer resistant to current therapies

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Pancreatic Cancer
Researchers have now harnessed information to efficiently eradicate human Pancreatic Cancer cells in xenografts. Pixabay

Pancreatic Cancer is resistant to all current treatments. Patients have extremely poor chances of surviving for five years after being diagnosed but a new study found that a small molecule has the ability to induce the self-destruction of pancreatic cancer cells.

The study, published in the journal Oncotarget, was conducted with xenografts — transplantations of human pancreatic cancer into immunocompromised mice.

The treatment reduced the number of cancer cells by 90 per cent in the developed tumors a month after being administered.

“In research published in 2017, we discovered a mechanism that causes the self-destruction of human cancer cells during their duplication (mitosis) without affecting normal cells,” said study researcher Malca Cohen-Armon from Tel Aviv University in Israel.

“We have now harnessed this information to efficiently eradicate human pancreatic cancer cells in xenografts. The current results were obtained using a small molecule that evokes this self-destruction mechanism in a variety of human cancer cells,” Cohen-Armon added.

According to the researchers, the mice were treated with a molecule called PJ34, which is permeable in the cell membrane but affects human cancer cells exclusively.

This molecule causes an anomaly during the duplication of human cancer cells, provoking their rapid cell death.
Thus, cell multiplication itself resulted in cell death in the treated cancer cells.

Pancreatic Cancer
Pancreatic Cancer is resistant to all current treatments. Patients have extremely poor chances of surviving for five years after being diagnosed but a new study found that a small molecule has the ability to induce the self-destruction of pancreatic cancer cells. Pixabay

A month after being injected with PJ34 daily for 14 days, the pancreatic cancer cells in the tumuors of the treated mice experienced a relative drop of 90 per cent. In one mouse, the tumuor completely disappeared.

“It is important to note that no adverse effects were observed, and there were no changes in the weight gain of the mice, nor in their behaviour,” Cohen-Armon added.

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This mechanism acts efficiently in other types of cancer resistant to current therapies.

The molecule PJ34 is being tested in pre-clinical trials according to FDA regulations before clinical trials begin, the study said. (IANS)