Saturday January 19, 2019

Overweight in Middle Age Linked to Low Breast Cancer Risk

At ages 25 to 34, each five-unit increase in BMI was linked to 15 per cent lower risk

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Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

While obesity has been shown to increase breast cancer risk in elderly, for younger women the opposite seems to be true. For pre-menopausal women, a higher body fat was linked to lower breast cancer risk, according to researchers.

The study, published in the journal JAMA Oncology, showed that there was 23 per cent lower breast cancer risk linked to each five-unit increase in body mass index (BMI) between the ages of 18 and 24.

At ages 25 to 34, each five-unit increase in BMI was linked to 15 per cent lower risk.

There was a 13 per cent lower risk for BMI at ages 35 to 44, and a 12 per cent lower risk for BMI at ages 45 to 54 years.

“We saw a trend where, as BMI went up, cancer risk went down. There was no threshold at which having a higher BMI was linked to lower cancer risk,” said Hazel B. Nichols, assistant professor at the University of North Carolina.

Cancer
Representational image. Pixabay

The trend could be attributed to multiple factors such as differences in hormones, including estrogen — primary female sex hormone — growth factors, or breast density, Nichols said.

Estrogen has known to be a key driver of breast cancer. But, the small amount of estrogen produced by fat tissue before menopause may help tell the ovaries that they can produce less estrogen and also regulate other hormones or growth factors, Nichols said, adding that after menopause, women with higher adipose tissue have higher estrogen levels and usually a higher breast cancer risk.

“In young women, estrogen is one factor that contributes, but it’s not the whole story,” she noted.

Also Read: Cancer: Salient Features of The Killer Disease

For the study, the team pooled data from 19 different studies to investigate breast cancer risk for a group of 758,592 women who were younger than 55 years.

However, “this study is not a reason to try to gain weight to prevent breast cancer. Heavier women have a lower overall risk of breast cancer before menopause, but there are a lot of other benefits to managing a healthy weight that should be considered,” Nichols noted. (IANS)

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Obesity Can Shorten Your Dog’s Lives

"For many owners, giving food, particularly tasty table scraps and tidbits, is the way we show affection for our pets," German said

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A Labrador retriever named Jack dines at a pet restaurant in San Juan, Manila, Philippines, Sept. 6, 2014.
Obesity can cut short your dog's lives. VOA

If you thought that obesity affects only humans, you may be wrong. It can also shorten lives of your canine friends, finds a research.

The research, from the University of Liverpool in the UK, reveals that the lifespan of overweight dogs was up to two-and-half years shorter when compared to ideal-weight dogs.

“Owners are often unaware that their dog is overweight, and many may not realise the impact that it can have on their health,” said Alex German, Professor at the university.

“What they may not know is that if their beloved pet is too heavy, they are more likely to suffer from other problems such as joint disease, breathing issues, and certain types of cancer, as well as having a poorer quality of life. These health and well-being issues can significantly impact how long they live,” he added.

The study, published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, examined more than 50,000 dogs across 12 of the most popular dog breeds.

The results showed that the pups' attractiveness was lowest at birth and increased to a maximum before 10 weeks of age before declining and then levelling off.
Representational Image. pixabay

Although the study did not examine the reasons behind the extra pounds in dogs, feeding habits are thought to play a role in pet obesity.

According to a recent Better Cities For Pets survey, more than half (54 per cent) of cat and dog owners always or often give their pet food if they beg for it, and nearly a quarter (22 per cent) of cat and dog owners sometimes overfeed their pet to keep them happy.

Also Read- Actor Aamir Khan Feels Necessity To Guide Children on Good Lifestyle Habits

“For many owners, giving food, particularly tasty table scraps and tidbits, is the way we show affection for our pets,” German said.

“Being careful about what you feed your dog could go a long way to keeping them in good shape and enabling them to be around for many years to come,” he noted. (IANS)