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Padmavati will probably release on December 1. Instagram.

New Delhi, November 15: Undoubtedly, anyone could have expected undefined tremors to arise again for a Sanjay Leela Bhansali project, ‘Padmavati’ starring Deepika Padukone, Ranveer Singh, and Shahid Kapoor after the controversial yet blockbuster film, Goliyon ki Ras Leela-Ram Leela and Bajirao Mastani. The soon to-be released film is a historic depiction of Alauddin Khilji (played by Ranveer) and his lust to capture Chittorgarh as a means to own Rani Padmini, (played by Deepika). To prevent the villanous act, she and the rest of the women in the Chittorgarh fort committed jauhar as an act of self-immolation by not falling into the enemy’s trap. We’re sure the never-ending trouble that the Padmavati team seems to be in has kept you eyed on its updates.

PROTEST AGAINST ‘PADMAVATI’

Since the beginning, the not yet relaesed film, Padmavati has seen political interference from both the BJP and the Congress. Rajput group Karni Sena had been showing their strong resentment by all means that could be adopted be it beating up director Sanjay Leela Bhansali, vandalising the sets, and threatening to burn theatres that showed the film, every trick has been used to ensure an unsmooth run of the film on screens. They also destroyed the beautiful rangoli of Padmavati that led to furious Chittorgarh bandh.


Other political groups did not lose their accord with the historic film. A Congress leader, Pratap Singh Kachariya has demanded a ban on the film with a say that it distorts history.

While in Jaipur, ‘princess’ and BJP MLA Diya Kumari, a representer of both the glamorous and political sides of Jaipur’s ‘royal family’, also issued a similar opposing statement on Padmavati like the congress.

Haryana Health minister Anil Vij and former Chief Minister of Gujarat, Shankersinh Vaghela also announced it’s plan to approach the state government for seeking a ban on the upcoming Bollywood movie ‘Padmavati’ by the Censor Board.

BJP leader hailing from Madhya Pradesh, Akhilesh Khandelwal, declared a reward of Rs 10,000 for the one who could slap the filmmaker of Padmavati, Sanjay Leela Bhansali, with a shoe. He told the media that we, the citizens are responsible to protect the dignity and the history created by our forefathers.


Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s film, ‘Padmavati’ stars Deepika Padukone, Shahid Kapoor, Ranveer Singh. Twitter @filmpadmavati.

SHRI RAJPUT KARNI SENA EXPOSED

The fake patriotism of the Shri Rajput Karni Sena was found out on investigation by the India Today team. They presented up a fake notion of being an an agent of a Bollywood production house who is planning to work on a fictional romance of the Mughal Era, to which the president of the Karni Sena group expressed no objection.

For a ‘meagre’ price of Rs 1.50 Crore, the Shri Rajput Karni Sena promised to enact an incident of vandalism, which would be recorded and advertised online for publicity.


Padmavati enthrals around the historic story of Rani Padmini and King of Chittorgarh. Twitter @filmpadmavati.

WILL PADMAVATI HAVE A SMOOTH RELEASE?

Now, that’s the real and undefined question that we all are going to discover in the meantime. With roadblocks coming up continuously, we doubt whether the film will enshine like the previous blockbusters or leave the expectations of the audience in shatters. Well, after so much controversy, the film has surely gained enough audience attention giving you enough reasons to not miss it and watch it on the big screen. Maybe, that’s what they desired, publicity with lots of political intervention. In the words of Deepika Padukone, who beholds the role of Rani Padmini in Padmavati, “Nothing and no one can stop this film”, we hope the film, Padmavati ends up well at the box office with a smooth release.

Prepared by Bhavana Rathi of NewsGram. Twitter @tweet_bhavana


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