Friday April 10, 2020

Painkiller Ibuprofen Has Negative Effects on The Liver: Researchers

This popular painkiller may affect liver enzymes

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liver painkiller
Popular painkiller ibuprofen may have more significant effects on the liver than previously thought. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Researchers, including one of an Indian-origin, have found that the popular painkiller ibuprofen may have more significant effects on the liver than previously thought.

Ibuprofen belongs to a group of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, widely used over the counter to treat pain and fever. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, picked mice for an experiment and showed marked differences between males and females.

“It’s well-established that ibuprofen can cause heart problems and increase stroke risk, but the effects on the liver were less well understood, said study researcher Aldrin Gomes, Professor at University of California, Davis (UC Davis) in the US.

For the findings, Gomes, postdoctoral Indian-origin researcher Shuchita Tiwari and colleagues dosed mice with a moderate amount of ibuprofen for a week — equivalent to an adult human taking about 400 mg of the drug daily.

liver painkiller
Regular usage of ibuprofen can damage the liver and lead to other diseases. Pixabay

Then they used advanced mass spectrometry at the UC Davis’ Proteomics Core Facility to capture information on all the metabolic pathways in liver cells. “We found that ibuprofen caused many more protein expression changes in the liver than we expected,” Gomes said. According to the researchers, at least 34 different metabolic pathways were altered in male mice treated with ibuprofen.

They included pathways involved in the metabolism of amino acids, hormones, and vitamins as well as the production of reactive oxygen and hydrogen peroxide inside cells. Hydrogen peroxide damages proteins and stresses liver cells. The researchers found that ibuprofen had different, and in some cases opposite, effects in the livers of male and female mice.

For example, the proteasome — a waste-disposal system that removes unwanted proteins — responded differently in males and females. Ibuprofen elevated the activity of cytochrome P450, which breaks down drugs, in females but decreased it in males.

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“The elevation in cytochrome P450 could mean that other drugs taken with ibuprofen could stay in the body for a longer duration in males and this has never been shown before. No drug is perfect, as all drugs have side effects,” Gomes said.

However, many commonly used drugs such as ibuprofen are being overused and should not be used for certain conditions such as mild pain,” Gomes concluded. (IANS)

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Vitamin-D Rich Food May Be Good For Your Heart Health

The research from Harokopio University was conducted during 2001-2012 and included 1,514 men and 1,528 women from the greater Athens area, in Greece  

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Vitamin-D
People who get too little vitamin D may develop soft, thin, and brittle bones, a condition known as rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Pixabay

Want to live longer with a healthy heart? Start consuming vitamin D-rich food as researchers have found that consuming foods high in vitamin D can have heart-protective effects.

Vitamin D is a nutrient found in some foods that is needed for health and to maintain strong bones. It does so by helping the body absorb calcium (one of bone’s main building blocks) from food and supplements.

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Some food items that are high in vitamin D are salmon fish, herring and sardines, cheese, cod liver oil, canned tuna, egg yolks, mushrooms and fortified foods. People who get too little vitamin D may develop soft, thin, and brittle bones, a condition known as rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults.

The current study, published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, aimed to evaluate the association between dietary vitamin D intake and 10-year first fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD), conventional CVD risk factors and surrogate markers related to inflammation, coagulation, insulin resistance, liver and renal function.

The research from Harokopio University was conducted during 2001-2012 and included 1,514 men and 1,528 women from the greater Athens area, in Greece.

Heart
Want to live longer with a healthy heart? Start consuming vitamin D-rich food as researchers have found that consuming foods high in vitamin D can have heart-protective effects. Pixabay

Want to live longer with a healthy heart? Start consuming vitamin D-rich food as researchers have found that consuming foods high in vitamin D can have heart-protective effects. PixabayAccording to the researchers, dietary assessment was based on a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire.

Daily intake of vitamin D was calculated using a standardised food database.

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The research found that in the lowest, middle, and highest categories of vitamin D intake, cardiovascular events (such as heart attacks and strokes) occurred in 24 per cent, 17 per cent, and 12 per cent of men and 14 per cent, 10 per cent, and 11 per cent of women.

In contrast with vitamin D supplementation trials that have shown modest to neutral beneficial effects on heart health, this study revealed that increased vitamin D intake from food sources may protect against heart-related problems, especially in men. (IANS)