Tuesday November 19, 2019
Home India Pakistan usin...

Pakistan using Kabul as pawn against India by blocking Indo-Afgan trade

Instead of using the excuse of no response from Pakistan, India could have sent the supplies by open routes and it would have reached Afghanistan by now. India uses the excuse of humanitarian grounds, for which it has no respect

1
//
Ashraf Ghani, wikimedia

New Delhi, Sept 16, 2016: It is really ‘petty’ of Pakistan to use Kabul as a pawn against India by blocking the trade. “Afghanistan is landlocked but thinks openly, Pakistan has access to the sea and thinks like a landlocked country,” said Afghanistan President Ashraf Ghani, on Thursday at Delhi’s Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses.

Ghani further added that Kabul won’t be taking this lying down. “Afghanistan is at (a) crossroads, it’s no longer a landlocked country, those who block us will be blocked. Why are we concerned that a country (Pakistan) can block two great nations (India and Afghanistan) from trading? Anyway, with Chabahar (port), (Pakistan’s) monopoly will end.” It was solely referring to the warning given by Kabul on Sunday and that Afghanistan would shut Pakistan’s transit route to Central Asian countries if it tries to block the Afghan traders to use the Wagah border to trade with India, mentioned TOI report.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

https://twitter.com/NewsGram1/status/775226577051324416

Pakistan doesn’t really appear to be bothered by it. On Thursday, Ghani said what he thinks of such policy. He made it very clear that he is referring to Pakistan when he said, “States do not behave like maligned non-states actors vis-a-vis their neighbours.”

TOI reports mentioned, recently India wanted to supply 1.7 lakh tonne of wheat to Afghanistan, to which foreign secretary S Jaishankar said, “We made a request to the Pakistan government. (But) we didn’t get a reply.”

https://twitter.com/NewsGram1/status/772695809615859712

The response to foreign secretary S Jaishankar comment was published in Dawn newspaper on Friday. A spokesman told Dawn that Jaishankar’s request “was made days before the killing of Burhan Wani.”

Well, what exactly the killing of Wani, a Kashmiri terrorist, has to do with the wheat trade to Afghanistan, the officer didn’t really say that. It added, there is no such agreement with India to use Pakistan’s land routes for trading with Afghanistan.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

“Instead of using the excuse of no response from Pakistan, India could have sent the supplies by open routes and it would have reached Afghanistan by now. India uses the excuse of humanitarian grounds, for which it has no respect,” Pakistan’s foreign office spokesperson Nafees Zakaria said, sticking nose in India’s internal affairs, by referring to Kashmir.

Apart from this, the recent statements by other Pakistani officials pretty much confirm the using of Afganistan against India in the battle.

A top government official of Pakistan told, there was no way by which Pakistan would accede to the Afghan President’s demand to trade with India through Wagah.

– prepared by Pinaz Kazi of NewsGram. Twitter: @PinazKazi

  • Ayushi Gaur

    It’s financial blockage to the nations

Next Story

Pakistan, India to Allow Sikh Pilgrims Visa-Free Access to Gurudwara Darbar Sahib Kartarpur

Pakistan and India agreed late last year to open the Kartarpur corridor, which will lead from the Indian border straight to the temple, with sides fenced off

0
sikh pilgrimages, holiest temple in pakistan, gurudwara darbar sahib
FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2018 file photo, Indian Sikh pilgrims visit Gurdwara Darbar Sahib, the shrine of their spiritual leader Guru Nanak Dev in Kartarpur, Pakistan. VOA

Pakistan and India have agreed to “expeditiously” work out issues related to a new border crossing that would allow Sikh pilgrims visa-free access to one of their holiest temples in Pakistan.

High-level delegations from the two nuclear-armed rival countries met Sunday on the Pakistani side of the Wagah border checkpoint to discuss what is named the “Kartarpur Corridor.”   The number and safety of pilgrims as well as infrastructure were among the issues on the agenda.

The temple, known as Gurdwara Darbar Sahib Kartarpur, is one of the holiest sites in Sikhism and it is believed to have been built on the final resting place of Guru Nanak, the founder of the religion, who died in the 16th Century.

The chief of the Pakistani delegation told a post-meeting news conference that both sides have resolved most of the issues and another meeting would be required before a final agreement is reached.

gurudwara darbar sahib, sikh pilgrimages
Pakistan Foreign Ministry spokesman Mohammad Faisal, center, briefs the media before the meeting with Indian officials at Wagah border, near Lahore, Pakistan, Sunday, July 14, 2019.

“We had in-depth and productive discussions on the proposed draft agreement and agreed to expeditiously finalize the modalities for operationalizing the Kartarpur Corridor in time for the 550 the anniversary celebrations,” Mohammad Faisal said.

India and Pakistan are aiming to make the corridor operational by November, ahead of the commemoration of the 550th birth anniversary of Guru Nanak.

India’s Sikh minority community has long sought easier access to the temple in Kartarpur. Currently, pilgrims must must first secure visas, travel to the eastern city of Lahore or other major Pakistani destinations before driving to Kartarpur. Political tensions between India and Pakistan often make it difficult for citizens of both the countries to secure timely visas.

sikh pilgrimages, gurudwara darbar sahib
Indian officials from Ministry for External Affairs arrive after crossing the border for a meeting with Pakistani officials at Wagah border, near Lahore, Pakistan, July 14, 2019. VOA

Pakistan and India agreed late last year to open the Kartarpur corridor, which will lead from the Indian border straight to the temple, with sides fenced off.

The progress toward opening the new border crossing later this year marks a rare instance of cooperation between the two countries, which have fought three wars against each other and came close to a fourth one in February this year.

ALSO READ: Sikh Temple Gurudwara in Belgium closed for security reasons

Most of the conflicts stemmed from the divided Kashmir region, claimed by both sides in its entirety, and it continues to be the primary source of regional tensions. (VOA)