Monday July 16, 2018
Home India Pakistan oppo...

Pakistan opposes Construction of Kishanganga and Ratle hydroelectric Plants being built by India

The implementation of twin hydroelectric power plants has been now confirmed

0
//
117
hydroelectric power plant, India, Pakistan
Pakistan opposes Construction of Kishanganga and Ratle hydroelectric Plants being built by India (representative image). Pixabay
Republish
Reprint
  • India has now been permitted to construct hydroelectric power plants
  • The decision has been finalized by the World Bank
  • The two hydroelectric power plants are Kishanganga and Ratle

New Delhi, August 3, 2017: Under certain restrictions from Indus Waters Treaty (IWT), India has been allowed to construct hydroelectric power facilities. This hydro power generation will be implemented on the tributaries of the rivers Jhelum and Chenab. India has been permitted to build the two hydroelectric power plants Kishanganga (330 megawatts) and Ratle (850 megawatts).

The construction of the hydroelectric power plants had been facing opposition since long. However, the World Bank’s comments have been finalized as the officials from India-Pakistan concluded the discussion over the IWT, mentioned PTI report.

“Among other uses, India is permitted to construct hydroelectric power facilities on these rivers subject to constraints specified in annexures to the treaty,” the Bank declared in its fact sheet.

India and Pakistan are yet to agree on whether the technical design features of the two hydroelectric power plants contravene the treaty. However, it is noted that the discussions on the technical issues of the IWT took place this week “in a spirit of goodwill and cooperation”.

Furthermore, the World Bank has informed that Pakistan has asked it to facilitate the setting up of a Court of Arbitration to look into its concerns about the designs of the two hydroelectric power projects.

On this context, regarding the setting up of hydroelectric power plants, India has asked for the appointment of neutral experts to look into the issues concerned and especially the “technical ones”. The IWT was signed in 1960 after nine years of negotiations between India and Pakistan with the help of the World Bank, which is also a signatory.

The World Bank had assured earlier that the “continued neutrality and impartiality in helping the parties to find and an amicable way forward.”  to the Indian Ambassador. The two countries last held talks over the two projects in March this year during the meeting of the Permanent Indus Commission (PIC) in Pakistan.

Well, the news of the hydroelectric power plants comes amidst a number of terror attacks and threats by on India by Pakistan based terror groups.

– prepared by Puja Sinha of NewsGram. Twitter: @pujas1994


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt. 
Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Cepheid to Establish Manufacturing Unit for TB Diagnostics in India

Rifampicin is a drug commonly used in treating TB bacteria in first line of treatment

0
The GeneXpert Edge is developed specifically for near-patient testing, to help support a one visit test-and-treat approach.
The GeneXpert Edge is developed specifically for near-patient testing, to help support a one visit test-and-treat approach. (IANS)

Expanding its footprint in India, US-based molecular diagnostics company Cepheid Inc on Thursday announced its plans to establish a manufacturing unit in the country to improve Tuberculosis (TB) diagnostics.

Cepheid’s GeneXpert MTB/RIF test is a closed-cartridge-based system that is easy to operate by minimally trained staff and gives results in approximately two hours, speeding the conventional backlog that used to exist in traditional diagnostic methods.

The new manufacturing unit would produce MTB/RIF test cartridges, contribute to the government’s “Make in India” initiative and thus bringing the company’s global expertise in TB diagnostics to India, the company said in a statement.

As part of the plan, Cepheid also unveiled its latest portable, easy-to-use TB-testing system — the GeneXpert Edge — which is expected to be available in India later this year, the company said.

The GeneXpert Edge is developed specifically for near-patient testing, to help support a one visit test-and-treat approach.

“Cepheid recognises the need for technological advancement and is committed to contributing significantly to India’s goal of TB eradication,” said Peter Farrell, Executive Vice President, Worldwide Commercial Operations, Cepheid.

Cepheid's Xpert MTB/RIF test has the potential to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB)
Cepheid’s Xpert MTB/RIF test has the potential to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB).

“We are hopeful that GeneXpert Edge will help eliminate delays in TB diagnostics by providing definitive results within hours and facilitating fast and easy last-mile delivery even in the remote villages of India,” he added.

India has nearly one-fourth of the global TB patients and an estimated 4.8 lakh lives are lost every year due to delayed diagnosis and inadequate treatment and there are above 2.5 million new cases of TB every year. The country aims to eradicate TB by 2025.

Approved by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 2010, more than 1,200 Cepheid’s GeneXpert Systems have been installed in the last two years at various Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) sites in the country and more than 2.5 million cartridges were supplied last year at various centres of Central TB Division (CTD).

Also Read: Fruit Bats Identified As Source Of Nipah Virus Outbreak in Kerala

Cepheid’s Xpert MTB/RIF test has the potential to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB) and rifampicin-resistance mutations, which are markers for MDR-TB strains in under two hours.

Rifampicin is a drug commonly used in treating TB bacteria in first line of treatment.

Xpert MTB/RIF tests also have excellent negative predictive value, which allows clinicians to manage TB-negative patients more effectively to prevent unnecessary and costly respiratory isolations. (IANS)