Saturday July 20, 2019
Home India Pakistani fir...

Pakistani firing kills Indian fisherman, Congress terms action ‘despicable’

0
//

New Delhi: An Indian fisherman was killed in firing by Pakistani forces on an Indian boat in international waters off the Gujarat coast, a fishworkers’ association said on Friday. The Congress termed the killing “despicable”.

www.dailyexcelsior.com
www.dailyexcelsior.com

The fisherman, identified as Iqbal, hailed from Porbandar in Gujarat. He was among a group of six people on the fishing boat Prem Raj, which had set sail from the port of Okha, 500 km from Gandhinagar on September 8.

The firing took place near the International Maritime Boundary Line (IMBL), Manish Lodhari, an official of the National Fishworkers’ Forum, told the media.

“We learnt from the fishermen that several rounds were fired on the boat near the IMBL at 9 am. The fishing boat was registered in Okha. A fisherman named Iqbal (40) has been killed in the firing,” he said.

Following the shooting, the Indian Coastguard rushed ships, Vijit and Meeraben, to probe the incident. The Vijit is escorting fishing boat Prem Raj back to Okha.

Congress leader Ahmed Patel said on Twitter: “The killing of Gujarat fisherman in broad daylight by Pakistan forces is despicable and unprecedented.”

He said that three months ago, he had written to the central government on the “urgent need to strengthen Gujarat’s coastal security but there was no response”.

(IANS)

Next Story

India: Asiatic Lions in Gujarat’s Gir forests to Have Radio Collars Fitted Around their Necks

A radio collar is a wide band of machine-belting fitted with a small radio transmitter and battery

0
Asiatic Lions, Gujarat, Gir Forests
Since June 11 up to now more than 25 representative lions of as many prides have been fitted with radio collar devices imported from Germany. Pixabay

The rare Asiatic lions in Gujarat’s Gir forests and surrounding regions will have radio collars fitted around their necks this month, similar to the lions of the African savannah and the Serengeti.

According to Chief Conservator of Forests in Junagadh D.T. Vasavada, since June 11 up to now more than 25 representative lions of as many prides have been fitted with radio collar devices imported from Germany.

A radio collar is a wide band of machine-belting fitted with a small radio transmitter and battery. The transmitter emits a signal at a specific frequency that can be tracked from up to five kilometres away.

When trying to locate a particular collared lion, the researcher dials the appropriate frequency and drives while listening for the beep signal. A directional antenna is mounted on top of the vehicle, and once the signal is detected, the researcher simply drives in the direction where the signal is loudest.

Asiatic Lions, Gujarat, Gir Forests
The rare Asiatic lions in Gujarat’s Gir forests and surrounding regions will have radio collars fitted around their necks this month. PIxabay

“This will help the forest department in monitoring of the group’s movement, research, knowing the territory of the animal and other details. From Sasan, a high tech monitoring unit will monitor their activities. A total of 75 radio collars have been imported from Germany for the purpose,” he added.

Vasavada said as all the members of a pride of lions normally remain within a distance of around half to one kilometer of one another, the location of the representative beast would in fact give the location of an entire pride.

Representatives of the entire lion landscape in and around Gir in Saurashtra region of Gujarat spread in the five districts of Gir Somnath, Junagadh, Amreli, Bhavnagar and Botad would be radio collared in around a month’s time.

According to the last lion census of 2015, there were 523 male, female and lion cubs in the Gujarat forests.

Also Read- Apple Working on New 5G-Enabled iPad with Foldable Display

During floods and other calamities and spread of diseases, the radio collars would be a big help for forest teams. The radio collars would also be helpful in letting the lion trackers know if any group of lions was close to the railway tracks or roads. (IANS)