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Paper Bags to replace Plastic Bags in Andhra Pradesh Temples to counter Environmental Pollution

Government bans the use of plastic products in temples

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Amravati, April 7, 2017: Plastic is one of the most important daily use items in human life especially polyethene bags.

They are used to carry things all around the world conveniently. However, it has also been acknowledged that these plastic bags are a threat to the environment and can prove to be fatal for the animals. There has been a widespread call for prohibiting the use of plastic products but less has been done to implement the same.

However, the Andhra Pradesh government is all set to ban the use of plastic products in the temples in the state. All the temples in the state will be free of plastic waste soon. The state government has issued orders, prohibiting use of plastic bags on the temple premises.

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Directives were issued to the authorities of all temples to allow paper bags without the images of deities as a substitute for packing of prasadam and laddus, said Principal Secretary to Endowment Department JSV Prasad.

The State government has decided to implement the ordered of the Supreme Court to ban the use of plastic bags, mentioned thehansindia.com report.

The Apex Court had given the order following a PIL by A Mithra H Patel in 1996.

The paper covers and paper bags should be deposited in dustbins after using them, he said. The government has taken a decision to ban the use of plastic covers to save the temple premises from pollution and avert a threat to ecology.

What will be the results of the decision is yet to be seen as it depends completely on the common man to implement the law and contribute towards saving mother nature. However, The factor that plastic bags are quite popular with the common masses can not be ignored.

-prepared by Nikita Tayal of NewsGram Twitter @NikitaTayal6

Next Story

Researchers Find Synthetic Fibers The Major Contributors of Environmental Pollution

Synthetic fibres are petroleum-based products, unlike natural fibres such as wool, cotton and silk, which are recyclable and biodegradable. 

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Synthetic fibres are petroleum-based products, unlike natural fibres such as wool, cotton and silk, which are recyclable and biodegradable.  Pixabay

Polyester and other synthetic fibres like nylon are major contributors of microplastics pollution in the environment, say researchers and suggest switching to biosynthetic fibres to prevent this.

“These materials, during production, processing and after use, break down and release microfibres that can now be found in everything and everyone,” said Melik Demirel, Professor at the Pennsylvania State University in the US.

Synthetic fibres are petroleum-based products, unlike natural fibres such as wool, cotton and silk, which are recyclable and biodegradable.

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Bacteria that consume plastics do exist. However, they are currently at the academic research phase and will take some time to gain industrial momentum. Pixabay

Mixed fibres that contain both natural and synthetic fibres are difficult or costly to recycle.

In the oceans, pieces of microscopic plastic are consumed by plants and animals and enter the human food chain through harvested fish.

In the study, Demirel suggested few things to prevent this: minimising the use of synthetic fibres and switching to natural fibres such as wool, cotton, silk and linen, even though synthetic fibres are less expensive and natural fibres have other environmental costs, such as water and land-use issues; large scale use of bacteria that could aid in biodegradation of the fibres for reuse; substituting synthetic fibres with biosynthetic fibres, that are both recyclable and biodegradable; and blending synthetic fibres with natural fibres to lend them durability while also allowing the blends to be recycled.

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Polyester and other synthetic fibres like nylon are major contributors of microplastics pollution in the environment, say researchers and suggest switching to biosynthetic fibres to prevent this. Pixabay

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Bacteria that consume plastics do exist. However, they are currently at the academic research phase and will take some time to gain industrial momentum.

The study was presented at the 2019 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in the US. (IANS)