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Here’s why Parents Should Educate Their Kids About Inappropriate Touching

Many parents delay talking to kids about bad touching

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Bad touching
One in four parents of elementary school-age children say they have not yet begun talking about inappropriate touching. Pixabay

Despite expert recommendations to talk about inappropriate touching during preschool years, researchers have revealed that only less than half of parents of preschoolers have begun that discussion.

One in four parents of elementary school-age children say they have not yet begun talking about inappropriate touching, according to the CS Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at the University of Michigan in the US. The report is based on responses from 1,106 parents who had at least one child age 2-9 years.

“This is a conversation parents should be having multiple times in age-appropriate ways,” said Mott Poll co-director Sarah Clark. According to the poll, three in five parents agree that the preschool years is the right time to talk about inappropriate touching. But among parents of preschoolers who have not talked about it, 71 per cent believe their child is too young.

Many parents also said they want more help navigating the conversation – but two in five say they haven’t received any information on how to talk with their child about inappropriate touching, the study said.

Bad touching
Parents shouldn’t disregard the reality of child sexual abuse and that is why they should talk to their kids aout bad touching. Pixabay

According to the researchers, just a quarter of parents have received such information from a health care provider. “Many parents have not gotten any information about how to talk with children about inappropriate touching. Without practical tips or suggestions, parents may be at a loss for how to begin,” Clark said.

Among parents of elementary school-age children who have not talked about inappropriate touching, the most common reason was just not getting around to it (39 per cent). Another 18 per cent said that discussions are unnecessary because inappropriate touching of children rarely happens.

“Parents shouldn’t disregard the reality of child sexual abuse. Statistics show that up to 1 in 4 girls and 1 in 6 boys will be sexually abused before the age of 18,” Clark said. The researchers noted that parents may start this process during the preschool years by teaching the anatomically correct names for body parts and explaining what parts are private.

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Other common reasons for not talking about inappropriate touching with school-age children include feeling the child is still too young (36 per cent), not wanting to scare the child (21 per cent), and not knowing how to bring it up (18 per cent). According to the researchers, sixty percent of parents said they’d like their child’s school to teach students about the topic, and 76 per cent want the school to provide information for parents. (IANS)

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Talkative Children Perform Better at School: Study

Chatty kids do get good marks at school

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Children
Researchers have found that young children go on to achieve more academic success when their verbal skills are enhanced. Pixabay

Dear parents, if you want to boost your childs academic performance, let them chat more. Researchers have found that young children go on to achieve more academic success when their verbal skills are enhanced.

The study, by researchers at the University of York in the UK, looked at why children from wealthier and well-educated family backgrounds tend to do better at school.

The researchers found that children from families of higher socioeconomic status had better language abilities at nursery school age and that these verbal skills boosted their later academic performance throughout the school.

“Our findings show that a child’s learning at home, when they are under five, is really important to their chances of later academic success,” said study lead author Sophie von Stumm, Professor at the University of York.

Children
Children from high socioeconomic backgrounds were at an advantage when it came to their non-verbal skills – such as solving puzzles, drawing shapes and copying actions – before they started school, the researchers said. Pixabay

For the findings, published in the journal Child Development, the researchers looked at data from nearly 700 British children.

The children’s pre-school ability was tested at four-years-old and their educational outcomes were tracked throughout school up until the age of 16.

According to the researchers, differences in language skills between children explained around 50 per cent of the effect of family background on children’s achievement in the first year of school.

This achievement gap widened over the course of their education, the study suggests.

“Kids from more advantaged backgrounds are more familiar before starting school with the language patterns and linguistic codes that are used in formal educational settings and are expected by teachers,” Stumm said.

“Not all kids get the same start in life, but this study highlights the importance of helping parents of all backgrounds to engage with their children in activities which enhance verbal skills – such as reading bedtime stories and engaging the child in conversations,” Stumm added.

According to the researchers, activities designed to improve verbal skills boost cognitive, social and emotional development, in addition to benefitting parent-child bonding.

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The researchers also looked at non-verbal ability at nursery school age and found that it had a smaller, but never-the-less significant role in explaining the link between background inequalities and academic success.

Kids from high socioeconomic backgrounds were at an advantage when it came to their non-verbal skills – such as solving puzzles, drawing shapes and copying actions – before they started school, the researchers said. (IANS)