Tuesday October 16, 2018

Parents Must Limit Their Children’s Screen Time For Better Brain Development

Based on the findings, paediatricians, parents, educators, and policymakers should promote limiting recreational screen time and prioritising healthy sleep routines throughout childhood and adolescence

0
//
7
Screen time
Limited screen time good for children's brains. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Parents, please take note. If you want your kids to do well in life, limit their screen time to less than two hours, encourage them to do physical activities and to have sufficient sleep, suggests new research.

Following a two-hour screen time limit during childhood and adolescence is particularly important for cognitive development, showed the findings published in the journal The Lancet Child and Adolescent Health.

“We found that more than two hours of recreational screen time in children was associated with poorer cognitive development,” said one of the researchers Jeremy Walsh, CHEO Research Institute, Canada.

The study involved more than 4,500 US children aged 8-11 years.

Children and parents completed questionnaires and measures at the outset of the trial to estimate the child’s physical activity, sleep and screen time.

In addition, children also completed a cognition test, which assessed language abilities, episodic memory, executive function, attention, working memory and processing speed.

The researchers examined how meeting recommendations for 9-11 hours of sleep, less than two hours of recreational screen time, and at least an hour of physical activity every day affected children’s cognition.

The more individual recommendations the child met, the better was their cognition, the findings showed.

In addition, meeting only the screen time recommendation or both the screen time and sleep recommendations had the strongest associations with cognitive development.

You May Also Like to Read About- NASA Developing Technology For Human Missions to Moon, Mars

“Behaviours and day-to-day activities contribute to brain and cognitive development in children, and physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and sleep might independently and collectively affect cognition,” Walsh said.

“Based on our findings, paediatricians, parents, educators, and policymakers should promote limiting recreational screen time and prioritising healthy sleep routines throughout childhood and adolescence,” Walsh added. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

The Woes Of Indonesia’s Children

According to Flint, Indonesia’s “reasonably high average income conceals a fair amount of underlying inequality.

0
Two sick children wait for treatment after being admitTed to a hospital in Agats, Asmat District, after the government dispatched military and medical personnel to the remote region of Papua to combat malnutrition and measles, Indonesia. VOA

Despite its middle income status, Indonesia is dealing with what experts say are unexpectedly high rates of childhood stunting. Now, its government – starting with the the president – is declaring war on the issue and committing to boost its response to the challenge following a World Bank publication that says 37 percent of Indonesia’s children were stunted in 2013, a rate on par with some far more impoverished nations of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Stunting is the medical condition that the World Health Organization defines as “impaired growth and development that children experience from poor nutrition, repeated infection, and inadequate psychosocial stimulation.”

While Indonesia’s health ministry and other agencies have been battling to address the problem for years, the administration of President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has now elevated the issue to be a national priority, making it a point to include it in last year’s Independence Day address.

“Before he mentioned it in the speech, I doubt it has ever been mentioned by a president in Indonesia,” said Claudia Rokx, a lead health specialist at the World Bank and one of the authors of the landmark book released last month.

indonesia
“If you’re