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Paris Among Most Expensive Cities, Chennai Among Cheapest

Los Angeles (US) was named the 10th most expensive city in the world, along with Israel's Tel Aviv

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People cool themselves at the Trocadero Fountain in front of The Eiffel Tower in Paris on July 27, 2018, as a heatwave continues across northern Europe. VOA

Paris, Singapore and Hong Kong are most expensive cities in the world while Delhi, Chennai and Bengaluru are among the cheapest places to live, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit’s 2019 Worldwide Cost of Living Survey.

The three top cities are tied at the top spot, CNN quoted the annual survey as saying. It evaluated the cost of over 150 items in 133 cities around the world.

Zurich, Switzerland, was placed at fourth position. Japan’s Osaka shared the fifth place with Geneva, also in Switzerland.

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An aerial view is seen of the construction site of the new Paris courthouse in the urban development zone of Clichy–Batignolles, northwest of Paris. VOA

Seoul (South Korea) and Copenhagen (Denmark) and New York (US) were jointly placed at the seventh spot.

Los Angeles (US) was named the 10th most expensive city in the world, along with Israel’s Tel Aviv.

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The world’s cheapest cities include Caracas (Venezuela), Damascus (Syria), Tashkent (Uzbekistan), Almaty (Kazakhstan), Karachi (Pakistan), Lagos (Nigeria), Buenos Aires (Argentina) as well as the three Indian cities of Bengaluru, Chennai and Delhi. (IANS)

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Chennai-Based Security Researcher Wins $30,000 after He Spotted Flaw in Instagram

He discovered it was possible to take over someone's Instagram account by triggering a password reset

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Muthiyah said the vulnerability allowed him to to "hack any Instagram account without consent permission." Pixabay

Chennai-based security researcher Laxman Muthiyah has won $30,000 as a part of a bug bounty programme after he spotted a flaw in Facebook-owned photo-sharing app Instagram.

Muthiyah said the vulnerability allowed him to to “hack any Instagram account without consent permission.”

He discovered it was possible to take over someone’s Instagram account by triggering a password reset, requesting a recovery code, or quickly trying out possible recovery codes against the account.

“I reported the vulnerability to the Facebook security team and they were unable to reproduce it initially due to lack of information in my report. After a few email and proof of concept video, I could convince them the attack is feasible,” Muthiyah wrote in a blog post this week.

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Chennai-based security researcher Laxman Muthiyah has won $30,000 as a part of a bug bounty programme after he spotted a flaw in Facebook-owned photo-sharing app Instagram. Pixabay

Facebook and Instagram security teams fixed the issue and rewarded me $30,000 as a part of their bounty programme, he added.

Paul Ducklin, Senior Technologist at cyber security major Sophos, however, warned while the vulnerability found by Muthiyah no longer existed, users should familiarise themselves with the process of getting back control of their social media accounts, in case they get hacked.

“In case any of your accounts do get taken over, familiarise yourself with the process you’d follow to win them back. In particular, if there are documents or usage history that might help your case, get them ready before you get hacked, not afterwards,” Ducklin said in a statement.

Muthiyah earlier identified not only a data deletion flaw, but also a data disclosure bug on Facebook.

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The first bug could have zapped all your photos without knowing your password; the second meant tricking you to install an innocent-looking mobile app that could riffle through all your Facebook pictures without being given access to your account.

“To be clear: he found those holes in compliance with Facebook’s Bug Bounty programme, and he disclosed them responsibly to Facebook,” Ducklin said.

“As a result, Facebook was able to fix the problems before the bugs became public, and (as far as anyone knows) these bugs were patched before anyone else found them,” he remarked. (IANS)