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Paris Summit: Climate change not of India’s making, Modi says

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New Delhi: Prime Minister Narendra Modi on the sidelines of United Nations conference on Monday said that India did not initiate the climate change threat rather it was under distress due to the effects thereof. He conveyed a stern message to the rich countries, stating, “those with the luxury of choices” ought to sharply reduce emissions.

Modi repeated his concerns at a clutch of fora with his cramped schedule squeezing in the much-talked-about unplanned meeting with Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif. He also had a dialogue with the US President Barack Obama where the two countries decided that development and environmental safeguard must work simultaneously, stated a leading daily.

He, very specifically, mentioned that India was not be blamed for global warming, pointing out that the country was bearing the brunt of developed nations.

“Climate change is a key global gainsay and it is not of our creation. It is the result of global warming that came from prosperity and progress of an industrial age powered by fossil fuel,” said Modi at the inaugural event at the India pavilion at the summit, strengthening the country’s position in the face of latest US denunciation of India at the last summit.

He also pointed out the repercussions of global warming on India and the adverse effect it would have on the local farmers.

“But we in India face consequences. We see the risk to our farmers. We are concerned about rising oceans that threaten our 7,500 km of coastline and 1,300 islands. We worry about the glaciers that feed our rivers and nurture our civilisation.”

Modi further mentioned the age old rhetoric of developing countries to let developed countries take the charge of their misdeeds and play a larger role in rectifying them as compared to the rest. He remarked that India wanted a “comprehensive equitable and durable agreement”, highlighting a request of less-privileged nations who reiterated that the developed countries have been the major polluters over the years, they should assume a greater role in fighting global warming.

He evidently charted out India’s approach for the 10-day-long summit, stating that the developed world must offer easy access to cleaner engineerings, macroclimate investment and the right to carbon space.

He also pursued to resolve intellectual rights concerns in the exchange of cleaner technologies at the Innovation Mission hosted by US President Barack Obama, with additional leaders of state and industry such as Bill Gates and Ratan Tata among the ones present there.

PM Modi expressed his apprehensions from the developed states to offer carbon space for the developing world to grow. He also specified that the rich nations cannot negate the prospects for the poor in the world to develop.

Apart from the Prime Minister’s comments on climate change, he also had a transitory discussion with Pakistani counterpart Nawaz Sharif at the beginning of the summit.

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Women Are Rarely “Put Front And Center” At The Heart Of Climate Action

Feminism doesn't mean excluding men

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Former President of Ireland and former High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson speaks during a meeting at Associated Press headquarters, in New York, May 8, 2017.
Former President of Ireland and former High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson speaks during a meeting at Associated Press headquarters, in New York, May 8, 2017. VOA

Women must be at the heart of climate action if the world is to limit the deadly impact of disasters such as floods, former Irish president and U.N. rights commissioner Mary Robinson said on Monday.

Robinson, also a former U.N. climate envoy, said women were most adversely affected by disasters and yet are rarely “put front and center” of efforts to protect the most vulnerable.

“Climate change is a man-made problem and must have a feminist solution,” she said at a meeting of climate experts at London’s Marshall Institute for Philanthropy and Entrepreneurship.

“Feminism doesn’t mean excluding men, it’s about being more inclusive of women and – in this case – acknowledging the role they can play in tackling climate change.”

Research has shown that women’s vulnerabilities are exposed during the chaos of cyclones, earthquakes and floods, according to the British think-tank Overseas Development Institute.

In many developing countries, for example, women are involved in food production, but are not allowed to manage the cash earned by selling their crops, said Robinson.

Earth depletion
Earth depletion, Pixabay

The lack of access to financial resources can hamper their ability to cope with extreme weather, she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation on the sidelines of the event.

“Women all over the world are … on the front lines of the fall-out from climate change and therefore on the forefront of climate action,” said Natalie Samarasinghe, executive director of Britain’s United Nations Association.

“What we — the international community — need to do is talk to them, learn from them and support them in scaling up what they know works best in their communities,” she said at the meeting.

Also read: Climate change can have an effect on the taste of the wines

Robinson served as Irish president from 1990-1997 before taking over as the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, and now leads a foundation devoted to climate justice. (VOA)