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Fillmaker Gurinder Chadha’s “Partition: 1947” Banned from Release in Pakistan over “misrepresentation” of Muhammad Ali Jinnah

  The film narrates the story of the trauma that people went through due to the division, and how it changed their lives

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Partition: 1947 by Gurinder Chadha film poster
Partition: 1947 by Gurinder Chadha film poster. Twitter
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  • It is unfortunate my film has been banned in Pakistan
  • She went back to trace her roots and document events that led to India’s Partition
  • The political narrative contradicts the national interest of Pakistan

New Delhi August 22, 2017: Filmmaker Gurinder Chadha’s “Partition: 1947” – the Hindi version of period drama “Viceroy’s House” has been banned from releasing in Pakistan, reportedly over “misrepresentation” of Muhammad Ali Jinnah. The director says it’s unfortunate.

“It is unfortunate my film has been banned in Pakistan. It will always be the land of my ancestors. ‘Partition: 1947’,” Chadha posted on Twitter on August 20.

 “Partition: 1947” was released internationally as “Viceroy’s House”. For the film, the British film director of Sikh origin, whose mother grew up in Rawalpindi, went back to trace her roots and document events that led to India’s Partition.

The film narrates the story of the trauma that people went through due to the division, and how it changed their lives. Featuring Hugh Bonneville, Gillian Anderson, Huma Qureshi and Manish Dayal, the movie released in India on August 18.

According to The Express Tribune, the Sindh Film Censor Board deemed it unsuitable, stating that “the political narrative contradicts the national interest of Pakistan”.

The Board’s secretary Abdul Razzaq Khuhawar said: “It’s a historical film and nothing negative is shown against Pakistan. The main reason for banning it was the misrepresentation of Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah.

“We felt his character was not portrayed correctly and it felt strange. Although the character only appears in a few scenes as the film mostly revolves around Lord Mountbatten, the actor didn’t look like Jinnah at all. If you had seen it, you couldn’t tell it was Jinnah. Otherwise, there were no issues with the film.” (IANS)

 

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Pakistan Exploits Situation In Jammu & Kashmir: India

India has accused Pakistan of cynically exploiting the situation in Jammu and Kashmir at the General Assembly

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Pakistan Exploits Situation In Jammu & Kashmir: India
Pakistan Exploits Situation In Jammu & Kashmir: India. flickr

India has accused Pakistan of cynically exploiting the situation in Jammu and Kashmir at the General Assembly while it was discussing an important issue.

“Such cynical attempts have failed in the past and do not find any resonance in this body,” Sandeep Kumar Bayyapu, a First Secretary in India’s UN Mission, said on Monday.

He was replying to a reference to Kashmir made by Pakistan’s Permanent Representative Maleeha Lodhi during a debate on the Right to Protect People against crimes against humanity.

“While we are having this serious debate for the first time in a decade on an issue that is of importance to all of us, we have witnessed that one delegation has, yet again, misused this platform to make an unwarranted reference to the situation in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir,” Bayyapu said.

“I would like to place on record and reiterate that the state of Jammu and Kashmir is an integral and inalienable part of India. No amount of empty rhetoric from Pakistan will change this reality,” he added.

Lodhi had said that many of the victims of killings and “mass-blinding” are “in Indian-occupied Jammu and Kashmir” and that they “have the further indignity of living under an illegal and alien occupation”.

Pakistan's Permanent Representative Maleeha Lodhi
Pakistan’s Permanent Representative Maleeha Lodhi. flickr

“Against this backdrop, calls for accountability would invariably smack of double standards and selectivity, especially when egregious crimes including killings and mass-blinding are being committed in full view of the international community,” she said.

However, Lodhi also said: “At its core, the responsibility to protect, is not a license to intervene in external situations, but, is instead, a universal principle of ‘non-indifference’, in keeping with historical context and cultural norms of respective settings.”

Also read: Women-Driven Rickshaw Program Creating Sensation in Pakistan

“We should also be mindful that the notion of ‘Responsibility to Protect’ does not become a mere re-enactment of the discredited ‘humanitarian interventions’ of the past,” she added. (IANS)