Wednesday July 18, 2018
Home India Partition not...

Partition not Over Yet: Pakistani Hindus still Struggling to Find their Way Back to India

Jogdas, Pakistani Hindu lives in the camp on the outskirts of Jodhpur

0
//
95
India Pakistan Protest
An elderly Pakistani Hindu woman makes an appeal during a protest against alleged human rights violations in Pakistan, outside the United Nation office in New Delhi, India, Wednesday, April 17, 2013. A group of Hindus from Sindh province in Pakistan are living in India after leaving their home country a year ago for fear of being persecuted, according to news reports. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)
Republish
Reprint
  • No job, no house, no money, no food
  • Pakistan’s largest religious minority are Hindus
  • There was not even a single day when we could live in peace

New Delhi, August 15, 2017: After India got Independence from British Rule, India and Pakistan were created, Pakistan became a separate nation on 14 August 1947 and India, a separate nation on 15 August 1947.

Still, for some Hindus, Partition is not over yet as they are still struggling to come back to India and even when they reach, they are unable to live a life of dignity as an Indian Citizen. For decades, Jogdas (a Hindu who lived in Pakistan) wanted to move to India to escape the hostility he suffered as a Hindu in Muslim dominated Pakistan. But the reality of life they (all Pakistani Hindus living in camps) are living over the border is starkly different from what they wanted. It has been 71 years since the partition, the largest migration of people in the human history ever. Pakistani Hindus are still moving from Pakistan to India, where thousands are living in deteriorating conditions in makeshift camps near the border area with no legal right to work.

Many have no choice but to move illegally around the places near which they live because their movements are strictly controlled by the authorities who sees anyone who move from across the border with suspicious eyes. It is not the kind of welcome most of them expected in Hindu-majority India in-spite of being Hindus.

ALSO READ: Indian-Americans Slam Singer Mika Singh for saying ‘Humara Pakistan’ in an Independence Day Video

Jogdas, 81, said” No job, no house, no money, no food. There, we were working in the fields, we were farmers. But here people like us are forced to break rocks to earn a living,” mentioned  AFP report. It’s a tough life for them.”For us, the partition is still not over. Pakistani Hindus are still trying to come back to their country and when they come here, they have nothing.” He lives in a camp on the outskirts of  Jodhpur.

Due to partition many people were uprooted, the estimate suggests 15 million and it triggered months of tragic violence and chaos all around, a million people were killed due to their religion. Amid all the chaos and bloodshed, Hindus and Sikhs came to India and Muslims moved to Pakistan.

Despite the mass departure of people from both sides, Pakistan’s largest religious minority are Hindus. They are believed to be around 1.6 % in 200 million Pakistanis with Muslim religion.

ALSO READ: ‘Blood Stained Hands’ Plan to Take Over Pakistan’s Political Reigns as Terrorist Organization Jamaat-ud-Dawa (JuD) Prepares to Enter Politics

Many say they have to face discrimination, risk getting kidnapped, raped and also forced marriage. Jogdas said that the harassment started very soon after partition. His family had only moved to  Pakistan only a few months before partition in order to escape a devastating drought. He said, “There was not even a single day when we could live in peace. I wanted to come back to live with my Hindu brothers.We are alone,” mentioned AFP report.

Pakistan’s Sindh province is the place from where many migrants came to India. They took a 4 hour long train journey, going through Thar Desert to Jodhpur in Rajasthan. They share the culture, food, and language of Rajasthan should  have made it easier for them to adjust in their adopted homeland. But the reality is totally different as they live far from local communities and local people in isolated camps, and are treated with suspicion by authorities on a frequent basis.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his government have said that it wants to make it easier for persecuted Pakistani Hindus to find refuge in India. Last year the rules were changed and it allowed immigrants to apply for citizenship in the state where they currently live, instead of going to the central government for this.

Hindus from Pakistan are qualified for a fast track to citizenship after living seven years in the country. But because of bureaucratic delays, the process of citizenship  takes much longer to complete.

Khanaramji, 64, in 2005 became an Indian citizen but the irony is that he  fled Pakistan in 1997. He said that there were many others with him but they gave up their hopes and returned to Pakistan, disappointed by life in India where they couldn’t live a life they thought was possible here. According to AFP report, he said, “There is no assistance from the government. We are just like cattle with no owners. We are just surviving on our own. Life becomes hell.”  What is worse than the poverty for them is the suspicion from authorities.”Those who do not have citizenship are harassed by (intelligence) agencies. They are always treated like suspects and agents of Pakistan,” said Khanaramji.

Hindu Singh Sodha said, “They spend most of what they earn on going to police stations and agency offices,” mentioned AFP report. He runs a charity in Jodhpur for Pakistani Hindus seeking to settle in India, said that they had high hopes from Modi when he came to office in 2014, but had to taste only disappointment.

The migrants are the ones who still have to face inspection whenever tensions come up between India and Pakistan; this is become a frequent occurrence under the Modi government. Their life becomes a living hell. “Because everything is affected, their shelter, healthcare, access to education, their livelihood,” said Sodha. But sad truth is that some tolerate this also.

Two years ago, Horoji fled to India with his two adult sons  after receiving death threats from their Muslim neighbors in Pakistan. “To save our lives, we had to run to India,” said 65-year-old Horoji. His grandparents were originally from India but they found themselves on the wrong side of the border at the time of partition. “My grandfather had gone to the other side for work. But he told us to move to India at the right time as he sensed that times would not be safe for Hindus in future.”


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt.
Click here- www.newsgram.com/donate

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Exploring the Rajasthani Cuisine

The foodie in you is sure to stumble upon more exotic and unique culinary delights if you set out to explore the place in detail

0
Rajasthani snacks make a great accompaniment to a glass of their special Adraki chai (ginger tea).
Rajasthani snacks make a great accompaniment to a glass of their special Adraki chai (ginger tea).

Home to royal palaces, mighty forts and unending deserts, Rajasthan is the land of legends and kings and queens. Rajasthani cuisine is famous all over India for its rich flavours and unique cooking styles. Being an arid state, the traditional cooking style has evolved in such a way that very less water is used in cooking. More oils and spices are used in order to preserve the food for longer times. Also, Rajasthani cuisine uses milk, ghee and butter in large quantities owing to the local production and availability of dairy products. Here are some top dishes which has made the Rajasthani cuisine famous worldwide. All you have to do is contact one of the car rentals in Jaipur for a day of restaurant hopping in the city.

Daal Baati Churma
This is the signature Rajasthani dish which is a combination of baked round bread called Baati, spicy lentil curry or Daal and a lightly sweet crumble known as Churma. It is so simple yet tasty and healthy. The baati is made out of wheat flour, ghee and milk and cooked in a baati cooker or tandoor whereas the daal is made of five different types of lentils. Churma is nothing but crushed baati mixed with sugar or jaggery and flavoured with cardamom.

Gatte ki Sabzi
Gatte is the gram flour balls which are used in the preparation of various dishes. Gatte ki sabzi is an everyday dish made by cooking gram flour balls in a gravy of buttermilk and spices. The sabzi can be relished with rice or roti.

gatte
Gatte ki Sabzi.

Ker Sangri
Ker Sangri is yet another traditional dish of Rajasthan which is a preparation of dried Ker berries with Sangri beans. These berries and beans grow easily in desert conditions, and hence it evolved as a staple food item. Ker Sangri pairs best with roti, daal and rice.

Laal Maas
Rajasthani cuisine is mainly vegetarian. However, the Rajput influence has led to the inclusion of some mouthwatering meat preparations in the cuisine. Traditionally, Laal Maas used to be prepared with deer meat or boar meat. In modern days, the dish is prepared using tender mutton. The spicy red curry is best relished with bajra ki roti. Liberal use of fiery red chillies imparts the unique red colour to the curry.

Mohan Maas
This is yet another mutton dish where well-cooked delicious mutton chunks are dunked in a
rich gravy of milk, cream, spices and nuts.

Rajasthani sweets and snacks.
A man with Rajasthani sweets and snacks.

Snacks
Rajasthani snacks make a great accompaniment to a glass of their special Adraki chai (ginger tea). Kachoris and Samosas are commonly found in every local sweetmeat shop in the city. Kalmi Vada, Bikaneri Bhujia, and Mirchi Vada are some of the other snacks to be tried.

Sweets
Rajasthani cuisine is not complete without mentioning its wide variety of mouth-watering
sweets and desserts. Most of their sweets are rich preparations involving generous usage of
milk, cream, ghee, and sugar. Sweet lovers cannot miss trying out Mava Kachori, Rabri Jilebi, Malpua, Balushahi and Ghevar.

The foodie in you is sure to stumble upon more exotic and unique culinary delights if you set out to explore the place in detail. Jaipur Outstation taxi services are also available for intercity trips within Rajasthan, to make the most out of your Rajasthan food expedition journey.