Saturday May 25, 2019

Passive Smoking Associated with High Blood Pressure

It included 131,739 never-smokers, one-third men, and an average age of 35 years

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Passive Smoking Dangers
Passive smoking in childhood has increased the risk of arthritis in adult smokers. Pixabay

Living with a smoker after age 20 is associated with a 15 per cent greater risk of developing high blood pressure, warn researchers, adding that avoiding smoky environments can reduce the risk of hypertension.

Passive smoking at home or work was linked with a 13 per cent increased risk of hypertension.

Exposure to passive smoking for 10 years or more was related to a 17 per cent increased risk of hypertension and men and women were equally affected, said the researchers at “EuroHeartCare 2019”, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology, in Milan, Italy on Friday.

“Avoid exposure to secondhand smoke regardless of whether the smoker is still in the room,” said study author Professor Byung Jin Kim from Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea.

“Our study in non-smokers shows that the risk of high blood pressure (hypertension) is higher with longer duration of passive smoking — but even the lowest amounts are dangerous,” Kim added.

Representational image. Pixabay

This is the first large study to assess the association between secondhand smoke and hypertension in never-smokers verified by urinary levels of cotinine, the principal metabolite of nicotine.

It included 131,739 never-smokers, one-third men, and an average age of 35 years.

Participants with hypertension were significantly more likely to be exposed to secondhand smoke at home or work (27.9 per cent) than those with normal blood pressure (22.6 per cent).

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Hypertension was significantly more common in people exposed to passive smoke at home or work (7.2 per cent) compared to no exposure (5.5 per cent).

“The results suggest that it is necessary to keep completely away from secondhand smoke, not just reduce exposure, to protect against hypertension,” said Professor Kim. (IANS)

Next Story

Work Stress, Impaired Sleep Associated with Higher Risk of Cardiovascular Death in People With Hypertension

Suffering from high BP? Don’t take work stress lightly

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The hypertension drug was able to slow down progression of these potentially devastating conditions and "so we believe it should be trialled in patients," he added. VOA

If you are finding it hard to deal with the pressure at the workplace, there is more reason to worry. New research has found that work stress and impaired sleep are linked to a threefold higher risk of cardiovascular death in employees with hypertension.

“Sleep should be a time for recreation, unwinding, and restoring energy levels. If you have stress at work, sleep helps you recover,” said study author Karl-Heinz Ladwig, Professor at Technical University of Munich, Germany.

“Unfortunately poor sleep and job stress often go hand in hand, and when combined with hypertension the effect is even more toxic,” Ladwig said.

The study included around 2,000 hypertensive workers aged 25-65, without cardiovascular disease or diabetes.

Compared to those with no work stress and good sleep, people with both risk factors had a three times greater likelihood of death from cardiovascular disease, showed the findings published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

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The team suggested that sleeping pill use may be an indicator of a future need for greater hypertension treatment and the need to investigate underlying sleep disorders or unhealthy lifestyles that may contribute to hypertension. Pixabay

People with work stress alone had a 1.6-fold higher risk while those with only poor sleep had a 1.8-times higher risk, the study said.

In the study, work stress was defined as jobs with high demand and low control — for example when an employer wants results but denies authority to make decisions.

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“If you have high demands but also high control, in other words you can make decisions, this may even be positive for health,” said Ladwig.

“But being entrapped in a pressured situation that you have no power to change is harmful,” Ladwig added. (IANS)