Tuesday January 21, 2020

Passive Smoking May Raise The Chances of Kidney Disease

The global health body states that of the seven million lives that tobacco claims worldwide each year, almost 900,000 are passive-smokers

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Besides affecting your heart and lungs, exposure to second-hand or passive smoking can also raise the chances of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which can lead to renal failure, warns a new study.

The findings showed that individuals with less or more than 3 days of exposure per week had nearly double the risk of having kidney disease when compared with participants with no second-hand cigarette exposure.

“Second-hand smoke exposure at home or in the workplace is still prevalent despite legislative actions prohibiting public smoking,” said Jung Tak Park from Yonsei University in Seoul.

“This exposure was found to be clearly related with CKD, even with less-frequent amounts of second-hand smoke exposure,” Park added.

Smoking pregnant lady outside hospital.

For the study, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, the team included 131,196 non-smokers and were classified into three groups: no-exposure, less than three days per week of exposure, and three or more days per week of exposure.

Cigarette smoking and exposure to second-hand smoking have been linked with higher risks of various diseases.

Also Read- Alzheimer’s Drug Holds Promise For Rare Neurological Disease, Suggest Researchers

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), smoking tobacco is globally the second leading cause of heart diseases after high blood pressure.Nearly 12 per cent of cardiovascular deaths worldwide occur due to tobacco abuse and second-hand smoking.

The global health body states that of the seven million lives that tobacco claims worldwide each year, almost 900,000 are passive-smokers. (IANS)

Next Story

Prenatal Smoking, Drinking Increases SIDS Risk; Says New Study

According to the researchers, these risks were in comparison to infants who were either not exposed to tobacco or alcohol during gestation or whose mothers quit tobacco or alcohol use by the end of the first trimester

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Effects of smoking
Excessive smoking can increase the chances of looking old as well. Pixabay

Children born to mothers who drank and smoked beyond the first three months of pregnancy have 12-fold increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), says a new study.

SIDS is the sudden, unexplained, death of an infant under one year of age. Many studies have shown that the risk of SIDS is increased by maternal smoking during pregnancy.

Some studies have also found that prenatal alcohol exposure, particularly from heavy drinking during pregnancy, can increase SIDS risk.

The findings, published in the journal The Lancet, provide a look at how SIDS risk is influenced by the timing and amount of prenatal exposure to tobacco and alcohol.

“Our findings suggest that combined exposures to alcohol and tobacco have a synergistic effect on SIDS risk, given that dual exposure was associated with substantially higher risk than either exposure alone,” said said first author Amy J Elliot from Avera Health Centre for Pediatric and Community in US.

For the findings, researchers followed the outcomes of nearly 12,000 pregnancies among women from two residential areas in Cape Town, South Africa; and five sites in the US.

men smoking
A Chinese man smokes in front of a pillar with a no smoking notice on display at a bus station in Beijing. VOA

The study sites were selected for their high rates of prenatal alcohol use and SIDS, and to include populations where the ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in SIDS remains understudied.

The researchers determined one-year outcomes for about 94 per cent of the pregnancies.

They found that 66 infants died during that time, including 28 SIDS deaths and 38 deaths from known causes.

Also Read: Marijuana Associated with Higher Risk of Heart Problems: Study

In addition to the almost 12-fold increased SIDS risk from combined smoking and drinking beyond the first trimester of pregnancy, they determined that the risk of SIDS was increased five-fold in infants whose mothers reported they continued smoking beyond the first trimester, and four-fold in infants whose mothers reported they continued drinking beyond the first trimester.

According to the researchers, these risks were in comparison to infants who were either not exposed to tobacco or alcohol during gestation or whose mothers quit tobacco or alcohol use by the end of the first trimester. (IANS)