Friday October 18, 2019

Passive Smoking May Raise The Chances of Kidney Disease

The global health body states that of the seven million lives that tobacco claims worldwide each year, almost 900,000 are passive-smokers

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Besides affecting your heart and lungs, exposure to second-hand or passive smoking can also raise the chances of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which can lead to renal failure, warns a new study.

The findings showed that individuals with less or more than 3 days of exposure per week had nearly double the risk of having kidney disease when compared with participants with no second-hand cigarette exposure.

“Second-hand smoke exposure at home or in the workplace is still prevalent despite legislative actions prohibiting public smoking,” said Jung Tak Park from Yonsei University in Seoul.

“This exposure was found to be clearly related with CKD, even with less-frequent amounts of second-hand smoke exposure,” Park added.

Smoking pregnant lady outside hospital.

For the study, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, the team included 131,196 non-smokers and were classified into three groups: no-exposure, less than three days per week of exposure, and three or more days per week of exposure.

Cigarette smoking and exposure to second-hand smoking have been linked with higher risks of various diseases.

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According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), smoking tobacco is globally the second leading cause of heart diseases after high blood pressure.Nearly 12 per cent of cardiovascular deaths worldwide occur due to tobacco abuse and second-hand smoking.

The global health body states that of the seven million lives that tobacco claims worldwide each year, almost 900,000 are passive-smokers. (IANS)

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Light Smoking also Damages Lungs, Says Study

Lung function in Light smokers declines at a rate much closer to that of Heavy smokers

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Lung function declines naturally with age (starting in one's 20s), and Smoking accelerates the decline. Pixabay

People smoking fewer than five cigarettes a day cause long-term damage to their lungs, according to a new research.

“Many people assume that smoking a few cigarettes a day isn’t so bad, but it turns out that the difference in loss of lung function between someone who smokes five cigarettes a day versus two packs a day is relatively small,” said study lead author Elizabeth Oelsner, Assistant Professor at Columbia University Vagelos College in the US.

For the study published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, the researchers looked specifically at lung function–the amount of air a person can breathe in and out–in smokers, ex-smokers, and never-smokers.

Lung function declines naturally with age (starting in one’s 20s), and it’s well-known that smoking accelerates the decline.

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Light Smoking can cause about the same amount of lung function damage in one year as a Heavy Smoking might cause in nine months. Pixabay

Because of the large number of people in the study–more than 25,000– researchers could see differences in lung function among light smokers (less than 5 cigarettes per day) and heavy smokers (more than 30 per day) that other studies have been unable to detect.

Their analysis found that lung function in light smokers declines at a rate much closer to that of heavy smokers, as compared to non-smokers.

This means that a light smoker could lose about the same amount of lung function in one year as a heavy smoker might lose in nine months.

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Smoking fewer than five cigarettes a day cause long-term damage to the lungs. Pixabay

The study also tested an assumption, based on a 40-year-old study, that the rate of decline in lung capacity “normalises” within a few years of quitting smoking.

The new study shows that although lung capacity declines at a much lower rate in ex-smokers than current smokers, the rate doesn’t normalise for at least 30 years.

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According to the researchers, light smokers may have a greater risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (IANS)