Monday December 16, 2019

Passive Smoking May Spike up Snoring Risk in Kids

Children born to fathers who smoke were at a 45 per cent higher risk of snoring than unexposed children

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Cigarette
Smoking, high BP raises risk of heart attack relapse: Study. Pixabay

Parents who smoke at home exposing their children to passive tobacco inhalation may increase the risk of developing habitual snoring in kids, according to a study.

The findings showed that children are at a two per cent higher risk of snoring for every cigarette smoke in home daily.

Children born to fathers who smoke were at a 45 per cent higher risk of snoring than unexposed children. While mothers who smoke increase the risk of developing habitual snoring in their kids by nearly 90 per cent.

Those exposed to prenatal smoke were almost twice as likely to develop habitual snoring.

Sleep apnoea is a serious disorder characterized by regular pausing in breathing while sleeping.
Sleep apnoea is a serious disorder characterized by regular pausing in breathing while sleeping. Pixabay

“Some parents may think snoring in kids is benign or even cute. But snoring is often the first step towards developing sleep apnoea and has been linked to high blood pressure, stroke and heart disease,” Lucy Popova, a researcher at Georgia State University was quoted as saying to the Daily Mail.

Published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, the study examined data from 24 existing studies that included nearly 88,000 children.

The team found that the younger a child is, the more susceptible he or she is to developing the habit of snoring.

Also Read: Hookah Smoking Posts on Social Media Promote The Habit, Here’s How

“Quitting tobacco use entirely is the best way to preserve your own health and the health of your children,” said Sophie Balk from Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in New York, US.

However the study was not able to show how smoking was associated with higher risk of developing habitual snoring among children. (IANS)

Next Story

This Face Mask Can Prevent Apnoea at Night

Here's a face mask that can help combat sleep apnoea, snoring

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Apnoea while sleeping
A face mask is found by researchers to combat apnoea and improve sleep. Lifetime Stock

Researchers have found that a night time face mask can improve energy levels and vitality in people who suffer from the condition sleep apnoea, which is associated with snoring and breathing problems at night.

The mask – called a CPAP machine – is currently recommended only to those people whose sleep apnoea is moderate to severe.

For the study, published in the journal The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, the researchers from Imperial College London picked over 200 patients from 11 National Health Service (NHS) sleep centres across the UK, and investigated the use of the treatment for mild cases of sleep apnoea.

“We are seeing increasing cases of sleep apnoea, and in a wide range of patients. Although the condition was previously thought to mainly affect overweight men, we now know it also strikes post-menopausal women, the elderly, and even children,” said study lead author Mary Morrell.

Snoring apnoea
The CPAP machine can prevent snoring due to apnoea. Lifetime Stock

“Around 60 per cent of all cases of sleep apnoea are classed as mild, but until now we didn’t know whether a CPAP would be helpful to these patients,” Morrell added.

Sleep apnoea affects over one billion adults globally, and causes the airways to become too narrow during sleep, causing people to briefly stop breathing many times throughout the night.

It can also trigger loud snoring, and cause frequent awakening from sleep, and subsequent daytime sleepiness.

According to the researchers, one treatment is a mask that fits over the nose or mouth called a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine, which gently pushes air into the mouth and throat, keeping the airways open.

Although previous trials have found a CPAP machine to improve symptoms of moderate to severe cases of the condition, this is the first large trial to find that mild cases of sleep apnoea can also be treated with this technology.

Combat apnoea
Sleep apnoea affects over one billion adults globally. Lifetime Stock

In the study, 115 patients were asked to use the CPAP for three months, while 118 received standard care for mild sleep apnoea, which includes advice on improving sleep and avoiding anything that can exacerbate the condition, such as drinking alcohol before bed.

The research revealed those who used the CPAP machine had an improvement of 10 points on a so-called vitality scale, compared to those who received standard care.

The vitality scale assesses a range of factors such as sleep quality, energy levels and daytime sleepiness.

The researchers also saw improvements in a number of additional factors among the patients who used the CPAP, including fatigue, depression, and social and emotional functioning.

Also Read- Follow these Tips For a Glowing Winter Skin

“Currently the NHS doesn’t routinely offer CPAP machines to cases of mild sleep apnoea, but our research suggests this treatment should now be considered,” said study first author Julia Kelly. (IANS)