Friday November 16, 2018

Passive Smoking May Spike up Snoring Risk in Kids

Children born to fathers who smoke were at a 45 per cent higher risk of snoring than unexposed children

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Smoking conventional, e-cigarettes daily can be more dangerous. Pixabay
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Parents who smoke at home exposing their children to passive tobacco inhalation may increase the risk of developing habitual snoring in kids, according to a study.

The findings showed that children are at a two per cent higher risk of snoring for every cigarette smoke in home daily.

Children born to fathers who smoke were at a 45 per cent higher risk of snoring than unexposed children. While mothers who smoke increase the risk of developing habitual snoring in their kids by nearly 90 per cent.

Those exposed to prenatal smoke were almost twice as likely to develop habitual snoring.

Sleep apnoea is a serious disorder characterized by regular pausing in breathing while sleeping.
Sleep apnoea is a serious disorder characterized by regular pausing in breathing while sleeping. Pixabay

“Some parents may think snoring in kids is benign or even cute. But snoring is often the first step towards developing sleep apnoea and has been linked to high blood pressure, stroke and heart disease,” Lucy Popova, a researcher at Georgia State University was quoted as saying to the Daily Mail.

Published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, the study examined data from 24 existing studies that included nearly 88,000 children.

The team found that the younger a child is, the more susceptible he or she is to developing the habit of snoring.

Also Read: Hookah Smoking Posts on Social Media Promote The Habit, Here’s How

“Quitting tobacco use entirely is the best way to preserve your own health and the health of your children,” said Sophie Balk from Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in New York, US.

However the study was not able to show how smoking was associated with higher risk of developing habitual snoring among children. (IANS)

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Poor Aerobic Fitness Increases Risk of Diabetes in Kids

Their aerobic fitness was determined by measuring peak oxygen uptake during a maximal exercise test

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Diabetes
Poor aerobic fitness can up diabetes, heart disease risk in kids. Pixabay

Lack of exercise, particularly poor aerobic fitness, in children increases their risk for developing Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, says a new study.

Children with poor aerobic fitness in proportion to their total body mass were found to have a significantly higher risk of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease than their peers having better aerobic fitness.

“Measures of aerobic fitness that are based on total body mass are better at predicting the risk of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease than measures that are based on skeletal muscle mass,” said Andrew Agbaje, lead researcher from the University of Eastern Finland.

“However, they exaggerate the role of aerobic fitness in children’s health,” he added.

For the study, researchers determined threshold values of aerobic fitness for 352 children, aged between 9 and 11 who are at an increased risk of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

Their aerobic fitness was determined by measuring peak oxygen uptake during a maximal exercise test.

The team also calculated variables indicative of the risk of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, such as waist circumference, blood levels of insulin, glucose, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides as well as blood pressure.

Also Read- Your Genes May Not Help You Live Long

The study, published in the journal Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, found that the traditional way of expressing aerobic fitness in proportion to total body mass overestimates the role of aerobic fitness in identifying children at an increased risk of these diseases.

“We should be cautious when interpreting aerobic fitness measures that are proportioned to total body mass in order to correctly identify children who truly need health and lifestyle intervention,” Agbaje noted. (IANS)