Saturday January 19, 2019

Passive Smoking May Spike up Snoring Risk in Kids

Children born to fathers who smoke were at a 45 per cent higher risk of snoring than unexposed children

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Smoking, high BP raises risk of heart attack relapse: Study. Pixabay

Parents who smoke at home exposing their children to passive tobacco inhalation may increase the risk of developing habitual snoring in kids, according to a study.

The findings showed that children are at a two per cent higher risk of snoring for every cigarette smoke in home daily.

Children born to fathers who smoke were at a 45 per cent higher risk of snoring than unexposed children. While mothers who smoke increase the risk of developing habitual snoring in their kids by nearly 90 per cent.

Those exposed to prenatal smoke were almost twice as likely to develop habitual snoring.

Sleep apnoea is a serious disorder characterized by regular pausing in breathing while sleeping.
Sleep apnoea is a serious disorder characterized by regular pausing in breathing while sleeping. Pixabay

“Some parents may think snoring in kids is benign or even cute. But snoring is often the first step towards developing sleep apnoea and has been linked to high blood pressure, stroke and heart disease,” Lucy Popova, a researcher at Georgia State University was quoted as saying to the Daily Mail.

Published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, the study examined data from 24 existing studies that included nearly 88,000 children.

The team found that the younger a child is, the more susceptible he or she is to developing the habit of snoring.

Also Read: Hookah Smoking Posts on Social Media Promote The Habit, Here’s How

“Quitting tobacco use entirely is the best way to preserve your own health and the health of your children,” said Sophie Balk from Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in New York, US.

However the study was not able to show how smoking was associated with higher risk of developing habitual snoring among children. (IANS)

Next Story

Nature Therapy Can Reduce Distress, Behavioural Problems in Kids

The results give a new possibility for investigating the link between the outdoor environment and well-being in pre-school children

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Being closer to nature Can Reduce Distress, Behavioural Problems in Kids. Pixabay

Does your child often feel stressed and depressed? A walk in the woods is likely to improve his/her mood, researchers said.

The study, led by a team from the University of Hong Kong, revealed that children who developed a closer connection with nature had less distress, less hyperactivity and had a healthy lifestyle with regard to active play and eating habits.

They also had fewer behavioural and emotional difficulties, as well as improved pro-social behaviour.

However, despite the extensive, adjacent greenness, many families are not using these areas, the researchers rued in the paper published in the PLOS ONE journal.

“We noticed a tendency where parents are avoiding nature. They perceive it as dirty and dangerous, and their children unfortunately pick up these attitudes,” said Tanja Sobko from the University’s School of Biological Sciences.

Kids play skip rope on Morro Strand State Beach. Flickr

In addition, the green areas are often unwelcoming with signs like “Keep off the grass”, Sobko added.

Recent research shows that spending time with nature may bring many health benefits, and many environmental programmes around the world are trying to decrease ‘nature-deficit’ and ‘child-nature disconnectedness’ in order to improve children’s health.

For the study, the team prepared a new 16-item parent questionnaire (CNI-PPC) to measure “connectedness to nature’ in very young children. The questionnaire identified four areas that reflect the child-nature relationship: enjoyment of nature, empathy for nature, responsibility towards nature and awareness of nature.

Also Read- Soothing Colours, Right Scent Aid Sound Sleep

The results give a new possibility for investigating the link between the outdoor environment and well-being in pre-school children.

The team further plans to test the effect of exposing children to nature and changes in their gut microbiota. (IANS)