Friday February 21, 2020

Peer Victimisation May Lead to Risky Health Behaviours: Researchers

Peer victimisation may lead to risky sex among teenagers

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Peer victimisation
Peer victimisation is associated with adverse psychological and behavioural problems. Pixabay

Researchers have found that peer victimisation is associated with adverse psychological and behavioural problems, including depression and risky health behaviours, such as substance use and unprotected sex with multiple partners.

According to the study published in the International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, in 2015, approximately one-third of high school students in the US reported having sex recently.

Of these, 43 per cent had not used a condom, 21 per cent had drunk alcohol or used drugs before sexual intercourse, and 14 per cent had not used any contraception methods.

“It is critical to create safe and private spaces for boys to share their experiences, and we hope that this research will encourage schools to consider efforts to destigmatize victimisation through peer mentorship and open communication,” said study researchers Youn Kyoung Kim from University of Tennessee.

Peer depression
People who have faced peer victimisation are more likely to suffer from depression. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers analysed the 2015 Youth Risk Behaviour System Survey, a nationally representative survey of US high school students containing data from 5,288 individuals who reported having engaged in sexual intercourse.

They also examined gender differences in the relationships between four types of peer victimisation (school bullying, cyber bullying, physical dating violence, and sexual dating violence), depression, and risky sexual behaviours among US high school students.

The results show that all types of peer victimisation are related to symptoms of depression for both females and males, and physical and sexual dating violence are associated with increased risky sexual behaviours.

However, school bullying does not predict risky sexual behaviours.

Among males, cyber bullying predicts increased risky sexual behaviours and the relationship is greater when a boy is depressed, the research said.

Also Read- Women More Likely to Die Because of Heart Failure Than Men, Says Study

The findings suggest that adolescent boys who are cyber bullied pursue risky sexual behaviours more frequently than girls who are cyber bullied.

Results may reflect a culture of toxic masculinity and highlight the need to pay special attention to male victims, who may be reluctant to self-identify, and therefore, at greater risk of negative health outcomes. (IANS)

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Higher Fruits and Vegetables Intake Beneficial for Women: Health Researchers

Higher fruits intake linked to fewer menopausal symptoms

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A healthy diet, rich in fruits and vegetables is known to benefit the human body in so many ways. Pixabay

A healthy diet, rich in fruits and vegetables is known to benefit the human body in so many ways, as now health and lifestyle researchers have found that it may also play a role in lessening various menopause symptoms.

Although hormone therapy has been proven to be an acceptable method for treatment of menopause-related symptoms for many women, the search for nonpharmacologic treatment options is ongoing, especially for women with certain risk factors and those who are not candidates for hormone therapy.

Specifically, there has been a focus on identifying modifiable lifestyle factors that might prevent or alleviate menopause symptoms, said the study, published in the Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society.

fruits veg
Eating fruits and vegetables may also play a role in lessening various menopause symptoms. Pixabay

“This small cross-sectional study provides some preliminary evidence regarding the influence of fruit and vegetable intake on menopause symptoms,” said study researcher Stephanie Faubion from The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) in the US.

NAMS is North America’s leading nonprofit organisation dedicated to promoting the health and quality of life of all women during midlife and beyond through an understanding of menopause and healthy aging.

According to the researchers, previous studies have suggested that dietary factors may play a critical role in estrogen production, metabolism, and consequently, menopause symptoms.

In particular, the consumption of fruits or a Mediterranean-style diet, characterised by a high content of vegetables, fruits, cereals, and nuts, was linked to fewer menopause symptoms and complaints.

This new study goes a step further in looking at specific fruits and vegetables and their effects on various menopause symptoms.

Also Read- Here’s why You Should Start Drinking Tart Cherry Juice

Citrus fruits, for example, were called out as having an adverse effect on urogenital scores compared with other types of fruits, as were green leafy or dark yellow vegetables compared with other vegetables, they added.

“There is ample evidence that a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables has a beneficial effect on health in a myriad of ways, but additional study is needed to determine whether various menopause symptoms may be affected by dietary choices,” Faubion said. (IANS)