Thursday December 12, 2019

Why People Love to Have Coffee or Beer in Summer: Decoded

The scientists also did a genome-wide association study of bitter beverage consumption and of sweet beverage consumption

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Starbucks coffee
Starbucks coffee. Pixabay

Whether you choose a dark roast coffee or hoppy beer in the summer, it may actually depend on how the drink makes you feel rather than how it tastes, reveals a genome-based study.

The researchers searched for variations in our taste genes that could explain our beverage preferences because understanding those preferences could indicate ways to intervene in people’s diets.

They found that taste preferences for bitter or sweet beverages are not based on variations in our taste genes but rather genes related to the psychoactive properties of these beverages.

“People like the way coffee and alcohol make them feel. That’s why they drink it. It’s not the taste,” said Marilyn Cornelis, Assistant Professor at Northwestern University Feinberg’s School of Medicine.

For the study published in the journal Human Molecular Genetics, beverages were categorised into a bitter-tasting group and a sweet-tasting group.

Bitter included coffee, tea, grapefruit juice, beer, red wine and liquor.

Beer
A pint of beer is poured into a glass in a bar in London, Britain. VOA

The researchers provided questionnaires to about 336,000 individuals asking them to report what they ate and drank over the past 24 hours.

The scientists also did a genome-wide association study of bitter beverage consumption and of sweet beverage consumption.

“To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide association study of beverage consumption based on taste perspective.

Also Read- Passive Smoking Associated with High Blood Pressure

“It’s also the most comprehensive genome-wide association study of beverage consumption to date,” said Victor Zhong, the study’s lead author.

According to the researcher Marilyn Cornelis, the study highlights important behavior-reward components to beverage choice and adds to our understanding of the link between genetics and beverage consumption — and the potential barriers to intervening in people’s diets. (IANS)

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Consumption of Coffee May Reduce MetS: Study

Drinking coffee may reduce heart disease risk

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Coffee-reduce MetS
Coffee has been proven to reduce MetS. Pixabay

Coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (Mets), say researchers adding that MetS increases the risk of cardiovascular problems, including coronary heart disease and stroke.

According the study, Assistant Professor Giuseppe Grosso from the University of Catania, Italy, reviewed his own scientific research on the association between coffee consumption and MetS in Polish and Italian cohorts and explored the potential mechanistic perspectives behind the inverse association.

His research suggests that polyphenols contained in coffee may be involved in the inverse association, specifically phenolic acids and flavonoids.

He also reviewed research that suggests that moderate coffee consumption is associated with a reduction of CVD, cancer, all-cause mortality and type 2 diabetes.

For the findings, Associate Professor Estefania from Toledo University of Navarra, Spain, reviewed meta-analyses considering associations between coffee consumption and MetS and discussed work in a Mediterranean cohort.

Her research involved 22,000 people and specifically considered caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee.

Reducing MetS- coffee
Average consumption of coffee can reduce the risk of heart diseases by reducing MetS. Pixabay

The study concluded that moderate coffee consumption (one to four cups per day) was associated with reduced risk of MetS, whilst higher intakes were not.

This was reported for both regular and decaffeinated coffee.

The inverse association between coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome was shown in both men and women, said the study.

Also Read- Women Affected The Most By Environmental Stress: Study

Meta-analyses also found that a moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may be associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome.

The study was presented at the 13th European Nutrition Conference organised by the Federation of European Nutrition Societies (FENS) in Dublin, Ireland. (IANS)