Wednesday January 29, 2020

People with High Vitamin A Intake at Lower Risk of Skin Cancer

Vitamin A is known to be essential for the healthy growth and maturation of skin cells but prior studies on its effectiveness in reducing skin cancer risk have shown mixed results

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skin cancer, vitamin a
Vitamin A is known to be essential for the healthy growth and maturation of skin cells but prior studies on its effectiveness in reducing skin cancer risk have shown mixed results. Pixabay

Researchers have found that people who intake high levels of Vitamin A were 17 per cent less at risk of getting a skin cancer as compared to those who ate modest amounts of foods and supplements rich in Vitamin A.

“Our study provides another reason to eat lots of fruits and vegetables as part of a healthy diet. Skin cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma, is hard to prevent, but this study suggests that eating a healthy diet rich in Vitamin A, in addition to wearing sunscreen and reducing sun exposure, may be a way to reduce the risk,” said Eunyoung Cho, Associate Professor at the Brown University.

Vitamin A is known to be essential for the healthy growth and maturation of skin cells but prior studies on its effectiveness in reducing skin cancer risk have shown mixed results. In the study published in the Journal of American Medical Association Dermatology, the researchers analysed data from two long-term observational studies in which 121,700 US women were followed from 1984 to 2012 and 51,529 US men from 1986 to 2012.

cancer, vitamin A
Participants’ hair colour, the number of severe sunburns they had received in their lifetime and any family history of skin cancer were also taken into account. Pixabay

The research team looked at the diet and skin cancer results of the participants. Between the two studies, around 123,000 participants were white (and thus had a significant risk of developing skin cancer), had no prior history of cancer and completed the dietary reports multiple times.

A total of 3,978 cases of squamous cell carcinoma were reported and verified within the 24 to 26 year follow-up periods. Participants’ hair colour, the number of severe sunburns they had received in their lifetime and any family history of skin cancer were also taken into account.

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After grouping the participants into five categories by their Vitamin A intake levels, the researchers found that people in the category with the highest average daily total Vitamin A intake were 17 per cent less likely to get skin cancer than those in the category with the lowest total Vitamin A intake.

The team also found that the majority of Vitamin A came from the participants’ diets, particularly from fruits and vegetables, rather than from animal-based foods or vitamin supplements. (IANS)

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Weight-Loss Surgery May Reduce Skin Cancer Risk, Says a Study

Bariatric surgery may reduce skin-cancer risk: Study

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Skin cancer
There is a connection between obesity and malignant skin cancer. Pixabay

The researchers have found out that Bariatric surgery might help in reduction of skin-cancer risk, adding that, this finding can be described as a key piece of evidence that substantiates the connection between weight loss and malignant skin cancer.

“This provides further evidence for a connection between obesity and malignant skin cancer, and for the view that we should regard obesity as a risk factor for these forms of cancer,” said study first author Magdalena Taube from University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

That obesity is a risk factor for several types of cancer is well known. The same applies to the fact that people’s risk level can be lowered by means of an intentional weight reduction.

However, the evidence for a connection between obesity and weight loss on the one hand and, in particular, malignant skin cancer on the other has been limited to date. The findings, published in the journal JAMA Dermatology, used data from the SOS (Swedish Obese Subjects) study.

Other data sources included the Swedish Cancer Register kept by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare.

weight-loss skin cancer
The researchers found that bariatric surgery was associated with significantly reduced risks for melanoma and skin cancer in general. Pixabay

The researchers studied a group of 2,007 people who underwent bariatric surgery, and compared them with a control group of 2,040 individuals.

The surgery group included 23 individuals who developed malignant skin- related cancer, i.e. squamous cell carcinoma or malignant melanoma, in parallel with marked weight loss. The median follow-up period was just over 18 years.

The largest difference related to malignant melanoma: 12 people in the surgery group were affected, against 29 in the control group.

The researchers found that bariatric surgery was associated with significantly reduced risks for melanoma and skin cancer in general.

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The skin cancer risk reduction was not associated with baseline body mass index or weight; insulin, glucose, lipid, and creatinine levels; diabetes; blood pressure; alcohol intake or smoking. The results of this study suggest that bariatric surgery in individuals with obesity is associated with a reduced risk of skin cancer, including melanoma.

The findings also support the idea that obesity is a risk factor for malignant skin cancer, including melanoma, and indicate that weight loss in individuals with obesity may reduce their risk for this severe form of cancer. (IANS)