Wednesday January 16, 2019

People Suffering From Diabetes Can Eat Eggs, says Study

"A healthy diet as prescribed in this study emphasised replacing saturated fats -- such as butter -- with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats -- such as avocado and olive oil," Fuller added.

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The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher.
High calorie meal for dinner may up heart disease, diabetes risk. Pixabay

People suffering from diabetes may finally eat eggs daily without a pinch of guilt. A new study suggests that eating up to 12 eggs a week does not increase cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes or Type-2 diabetes.

People with Type-2 diabetes tend to have higher levels of the ‘bad’ low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol which is a risk factor for heart diseases. As eggs themselves are high in dietary cholesterol, diabetics are generally advised to avoid consuming eggs.

But the findings, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, showed that eggs have little effect on the levels of cholesterol in the blood of people eating them.

“Despite differing advice around safe levels of egg consumption for people with pre-diabetes and Type-2 diabetes, our research indicates that people do not need to hold back from eating eggs if this is part of a healthy diet,” said study co-author Nicholas Fuller from the University of Sydney.

People suffering from diabetes may finally eat eggs daily without a pinch of guilt. A new study suggests that eating up to 12 eggs a week does not increase cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes or Type-2 diabetes.
Diabetes patients can eat eggs, Pixabay

“A healthy diet as prescribed in this study emphasised replacing saturated fats — such as butter — with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats — such as avocado and olive oil,” Fuller added.

In the initial trial of the study, 128 participants aimed to maintain their weight while embarking on a high-egg (12 eggs per week) or low-egg (less than two eggs per week) diet, with no difference in cardiovascular risk markers identified at the end of three months.

The same participants then embarked on a weight loss diet for an additional three months, while continuing their high or low egg consumption.

For a further six months — up to 12 months in total — participants were followed up by researchers and continued their high or low egg intake.

The extended study tracked a broad range of cardiovascular risk factors including cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure, with no significant difference in results between the high egg and low egg groups.

Also Read: Zumba Master Beto Perez Happy That People Are Health Conscious

At all stages, both groups showed no adverse changes in cardiovascular risk markers and achieved equivalent weight loss — regardless of their level of egg consumption, the researcher explained.

The findings are important due to the potential health benefits of eggs for people with pre-diabetes and Type-2 diabetes as well as the general population, the research said.

“Eggs are a source of protein and micronutrients that could support a range of health and dietary factors including helping to regulate the intake of fat and carbohydrate, eye and heart health, healthy blood vessels and healthy pregnancies,” Fuller noted. (IANS)

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Eating An Egg Daily May Keep Diabetes At Bay

In addition, the researchers identified several biochemical compounds in blood that predicted a higher risk of developing Type-2 diabetes, including the amino acid tyrosine

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Reason Why Middle-Aged Men Should Limit Their Protein Intake
An egg a day may keep diabetes away.

Eating an egg daily can have a beneficial effect on the blood metabolite profile that is related to a lower risk of Type-2 diabetes, a new study shows.

The findings showed that the blood samples of men who ate more eggs included certain lipid molecules that positively correlated with the blood profile of men who remained free of Type-2 diabetes.

“The study explored potential compounds that could explain this association using non-targeted metabolomics, a technique that enables a broad profiling of chemicals in a sample,” said lead author Stefania Noerman from the University of Eastern Finland.

Eggs remain one of the most controversial food items.High intake of eggs has traditionally been discouraged, mainly due to their high cholesterol content.

However, eggs are also a rich source of many bioactive compounds that can have beneficial effects on health. This means that the health effects of consuming eggs are difficult to determine based solely on their cholesterol content, the researchers said.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, 239 serum samples were analysed in four groups: men with higher (mean intake one egg per day) or lower (mean intake two eggs per week) egg intake who developed Type-2 diabetes (cases) or remained healthy (controls) during the mean follow-up of nearly 20 years.

The study suggested some plausible mechanisms which could at least partly explain the inverse association between egg intake and the previously observed lower risk of developing Type-2 diabetes.

Also Read- Protein Found in Spinach May Treat Alcohol Abuse, Mood Disorders

In addition, the researchers identified several biochemical compounds in blood that predicted a higher risk of developing Type-2 diabetes, including the amino acid tyrosine.

“Although it is too early to draw any causal conclusions, we now have some hints about certain egg-related compounds that may have a role in Type-2 diabetes development.

“Further detailed investigations with both cell models and intervention studies in humans that use modern techniques, such as metabolomics, are needed to understand the mechanisms behind physiological effects of egg intake,” Noerman noted. (IANS)