Wednesday November 20, 2019

People Suffering From Diabetes Can Eat Eggs, says Study

"A healthy diet as prescribed in this study emphasised replacing saturated fats -- such as butter -- with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats -- such as avocado and olive oil," Fuller added.

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The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher.
High calorie meal for dinner may up heart disease, diabetes risk. Pixabay

People suffering from diabetes may finally eat eggs daily without a pinch of guilt. A new study suggests that eating up to 12 eggs a week does not increase cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes or Type-2 diabetes.

People with Type-2 diabetes tend to have higher levels of the ‘bad’ low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol which is a risk factor for heart diseases. As eggs themselves are high in dietary cholesterol, diabetics are generally advised to avoid consuming eggs.

But the findings, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, showed that eggs have little effect on the levels of cholesterol in the blood of people eating them.

“Despite differing advice around safe levels of egg consumption for people with pre-diabetes and Type-2 diabetes, our research indicates that people do not need to hold back from eating eggs if this is part of a healthy diet,” said study co-author Nicholas Fuller from the University of Sydney.

People suffering from diabetes may finally eat eggs daily without a pinch of guilt. A new study suggests that eating up to 12 eggs a week does not increase cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes or Type-2 diabetes.
Diabetes patients can eat eggs, Pixabay

“A healthy diet as prescribed in this study emphasised replacing saturated fats — such as butter — with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats — such as avocado and olive oil,” Fuller added.

In the initial trial of the study, 128 participants aimed to maintain their weight while embarking on a high-egg (12 eggs per week) or low-egg (less than two eggs per week) diet, with no difference in cardiovascular risk markers identified at the end of three months.

The same participants then embarked on a weight loss diet for an additional three months, while continuing their high or low egg consumption.

For a further six months — up to 12 months in total — participants were followed up by researchers and continued their high or low egg intake.

The extended study tracked a broad range of cardiovascular risk factors including cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure, with no significant difference in results between the high egg and low egg groups.

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At all stages, both groups showed no adverse changes in cardiovascular risk markers and achieved equivalent weight loss — regardless of their level of egg consumption, the researcher explained.

The findings are important due to the potential health benefits of eggs for people with pre-diabetes and Type-2 diabetes as well as the general population, the research said.

“Eggs are a source of protein and micronutrients that could support a range of health and dietary factors including helping to regulate the intake of fat and carbohydrate, eye and heart health, healthy blood vessels and healthy pregnancies,” Fuller noted. (IANS)

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Study Says, Early Signs of Diabetes Can be Observed in Children

The study tracked over 4,000 participants of the Children of the 90s study, a birth cohort established in Bristol in the early 1990s

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Diabetes
The research was conducted among young healthy people who were generally free of type 2 Diabetes and other chronic diseases to see how early in life the effects of diabetes susceptibility become visible. Pixabay

Researchers have found that early signs of adulthood type 2 Diabetes can be seen in children as young as 8 years old.

Type 2 diabetes is most often diagnosed in middle age or later, with its symptoms slowly developing over many years.

“It’s remarkable that we can see signs of adult diabetes in the blood from such a young age, this is about 50 years before it’s commonly diagnosed.

“This is not a clinical study; nearly all participants were free of diabetes and most will not go on to develop it. This is about liability to disease and how genetics can tell us something about how the disease develops,” said study researcher Joshua Bell from the University of Bristol in the UK.

The research was conducted among young healthy people who were generally free of type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases to see how early in life the effects of diabetes susceptibility become visible.

The study tracked over 4,000 participants of the Children of the 90s study, a birth cohort established in Bristol in the early 1990s.

The researchers combined genetics with an approach called ‘metabolomics’, which involves measuring many small molecules in a blood sample to try and identify patterns that are unique to type 2 diabetes.

According to the findings, the research team analysed 162 pieces of genetic information and combined this with 200 measures of many small molecules in a blood sample, known as metabolics, to identify signs of type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes
Researchers have found that early signs of adulthood type 2 Diabetes can be seen in children as young as 8 years old. Pixabay

Data was taken once in childhood — at 8 years old, twice in adolescence aged 16 and 18 years and once in young adulthood aged 25 years.

They found levels of HDL cholesterol were reduced at age 8, while inflammatory glycoprotein acetyls and amino acids were elevated in 16 and 18 year old teenagers.

These metabolic features could be targeted to prevent young people from going on to develop type 2 diabetes in the future, the researchers said.

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The findings were presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Barcelona. (IANS)