Friday December 6, 2019

People Tend to Eat More with Friends and Family

We found strong evidence that people eat more food when dining with friends and family than when alone

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People, Friends, Family
Eating "socially" has a powerful effect on increasing food intake relative to dining alone, said the study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Pixabay

If you are planning to cut down on your daily food intake to get into shape, better dine alone as a new research has found that people tend to eat more with friends and family.

Eating “socially” has a powerful effect on increasing food intake relative to dining alone, said the study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

“We found strong evidence that people eat more food when dining with friends and family than when alone,” said research leader Helen Ruddock from the University of Birmingham in Britain.

Previous studies found that those eating with others ate up to 48 per cent more food than solo diners and women with obesity eating socially consumed up to 29 per cent more than when eating alone.

People, Friends, Family
If you are planning to cut down on your daily food intake to get into shape, better dine alone as a new research has found that people tend to eat more with friends and family. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers evaluated 42 existing studies of research into social dining.

The researchers found that people eat more with friends and family because having food with others is more enjoyable and social eating could increase consumption.

Social norms might ‘permit’ overeating in company but sanction it when eating alone and providing food becomes associated with praise and recognition from friends and family, strengthening social bonds.

The researchers called the phenomenon of eating more with friends and family “social facilitation”.

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They found that this social facilitation effect on eating was not observed across studies which had looked at food intake amongst people who were not well acquainted.

“People want to convey positive impressions to strangers. Selecting small portions may provide a means of doing so and this may be why the social facilitation of eating is less pronounced amongst groups of strangers,” Ruddock said.

The researchers explained that ancient hunter gatherers shared food because it ensured equitable food distribution.

In the case of social facilitation, we have inherited a mechanism that now exerts a powerful influence on unhealthy dietary intakes, the researchers said. (IANS)

Next Story

Google Photos Now Lets Users Manually Tag People in Photos

The says it doesn't share this information between accounts, according to The Verge

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Google, smart compose
The Google name is displayed outside the company's office in London, Britain. VOA

Several months after confirming that manually tagging people on Google Photos will become a reality, the company has finally rolled out the feature in which users will be able to manually add in many of the faces that its algorithm misses out on.

Those hoping that the feature would allow you to point at any area in an image and add a tag to it, will be disappointed.

Face tagging feature still relies on the tech giant’s algorithm and its ability to detect a person or pet’s face to begin with, Android Police reported on Wednesday.

google, online tracking
A man walks past a Google sign outside with a span of the Bay Bridge at rear in San Francisco, May 1, 2019. VOA

To manually tag people, open Google Photos, look for any picture with people or pets in it, and swipe up or tap the overflow key on the top right. This brings up the updated EXIF panel with the People section, recognised persons’ avatars, and an edit icon or pen on the right.

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As far as privacy is concerned, Google will automatically scan users’ photos for faces if they have the “face grouping” feature turned on.

The says it doesn’t share this information between accounts, according to The Verge. (IANS)