Saturday December 7, 2019
Home Lead Story Photos-only M...

Photos-only Mode On Facebook’s Mobile App to Suggest Algorithmically Suggested Photos

Facebook's in-app 'photos only' mode is under testing

0
//
Facebook
A photos-only mode for Facebook's mobile application is under testing. Pixabay

A photos-only mode for Facebook’s mobile application is under testing and it would let users see algorithmically suggested photos in a feed similar to its photo sharing platform Instagram.

The feature, named “Popular Photos”, affixes an endless scroll of algorithmically selected images from friends beneath the full-screen view of a photo opened from the News Feed. The result is an experience that is similar to Instagram feed, TechCrunch has recently reported.

Facebook, Instagram
Facebook already has Stories, messaging, profiles, and its IGTV-esque Watch video hub. Pixabay

A mode was first spotted in October and the trial has since concluded. The new feature is being worked on with future tests in mind.

Also Read- Instagram Likely to Expand its Private Like Counts Test Globally

The company refused to disclose more details or its motives for Popular Photos. Given Facebook already has Stories, messaging, profiles, and its IGTV-esque Watch video hub, it’s only the Explore tab and a dedicated media feed that are missing from it being a full clone of Instagram, the report added. (IANS)

Next Story

Social Media Giant Facebook Sues Chinese Company Over Alleged ad Fraud

According to a report in CNET, Facebook said it has paid more than $4 million in reimbursements to victims of these hacks

0
facebook, WhatsApp, stories, feature
An iPhone displays the app for Facebook in New Orleans, Aug. 11, 2019. VOA

Facebook has sued a Chinese company for allegedly tricking people into installing a malware, compromising peoples accounts and then using them to run deceptive ads.

Facebook blamed ILikeAd Media International Company Ltd. and two individuals associated with the company — Chen Xiao Cong and Huang Tao – for the fraud.

The defendants deceived people into installing malware available on the Internet. This malware then enabled the defendants to compromise people’s Facebook accounts and run deceptive ads promoting items such as counterfeit goods and diet pills, the social media giant said in a blog post.

The defendants sometimes used images of celebrities in their ads to entice people to click on them, a practice known as “celeb bait”, according to the lawsuit filed on Wednesday.

In some instances, the defendants also engaged in a practice known as cloaking, Facebook said.

Social Media, Facebook, Authenticity, Posts
The social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple’s App Store, July 30, 2019. VOA

“Through cloaking, the defendants deliberately disguised the true destination of the link in the ad by displaying one version of an ad’s landing page to Facebook’s systems and a different version to Facebook users,” said Facebook’s Jessica Romero, Director of Platform Enforcement and Litigation and Rob Leathern, Director of Product Management, Business Integrity.

Cloaking schemes are often sophisticated and well organised, making the individuals and organisations behind them difficult to identify and hold accountable.

Also Read: New Account of Twitter named @TwitterRetweets to Highlight Best Tweets

As a result, there have not been many legal actions of this kind.

“In this case, we have refunded victims whose accounts were used to run unauthorised ads and helped them to secure their accounts,” they wrote.

According to a report in CNET, Facebook said it has paid more than $4 million in reimbursements to victims of these hacks. (IANS)