Tuesday January 28, 2020

Physical illness And injury Raises The Risk of Suicide in Men, Not Women: Study

The researchers also found new potential risk patterns, including that diagnoses and prescriptions four years before a suicide were more important to prediction than diagnoses

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Men
Suicide is incredibly challenging to predict, because every suicide death is the result of multiple interacting risk factors in one's life, Especially for Men. Pixabay

When it comes to identify who is more at suicide risk, scientists have found that physical illness and injury raises the risk of Suicide in Men but not women, along with a plethora of other insights into the complex factors that may increase a person’s risk of suicide.

The study, led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and published in JAMA Psychiatry, is the first to use data from the population of an entire country (Denmark) and parse it with a Machine Learning (ML) system to identify suicide risk factors.

“Suicide is incredibly challenging to predict, because every suicide death is the result of multiple interacting risk factors in one’s life,” said lead study author Dr Jaimie Gradus, associate professor of epidemiology at BUSPH.

Dr Gradus and her colleagues looked at thousands of factors in the health histories of 14,103 individuals who died from suicide in the country from 1995 through 2015, and the health histories of 265,183 other Danes in the same period, using a machine-learning system to look for patterns.

Many of the study’s findings confirmed previously-identified risk factors, such as psychiatric disorders and related prescriptions.

Men
When it comes to identify who is more at suicide risk, scientists have found that physical illness and injury raises the risk of Suicide in Men but not women, along with a plethora of other insights into the complex factors that may increase a person’s risk of suicide. Pixabay

The researchers also found new potential risk patterns, including that diagnoses and prescriptions four years before a suicide were more important to prediction than diagnoses and prescriptions six months before, and that physical health diagnoses were particularly important to men’s suicide prediction but not women’s.

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“The findings of this study do not create a model for perfectly predicting suicide”, said Dr Gradus, in part because medical records rarely include the more immediate experiences — such as the loss of a job or relationship — that combine with these longer-term factors to precipitate suicide.

The findings, however, point to new factors to examine in working to prevent this persistent public health issue. (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s Why Light Alcohol Consumption Might Also Increase Cancer Risk

The researchers found an almost linear association between cancer risk and alcohol consumption

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Alcohol
In a study published in the journal Cancer, the overall cancer risk appeared to be the lowest at zero alcohol consumption. Pixabay

If you thought one-two drinks a day would not do any harm, think again. Researchers in Japan have found that even light alcohol consumption might increase the cancer risk.

In the study published in the journal Cancer, the overall cancer risk appeared to be the lowest at zero alcohol consumption. The elevated risk appeared to be explained by alcohol-related cancer risk across relatively common sites, including the colorectum, stomach, breast, prostate and esophagus.

“In Japan, the primary cause of death is cancer,” said one of the researchers Masayoshi Zaitsu from The University of Tokyo. “Given the current burden of overall cancer incidence, we should further encourage promoting public education about alcohol-related cancer risk,” Zaitsu said. The team examined clinical data on 63,232 patients with cancer and 63,232 controls matched for sex, age, hospital admission date, and admitting hospital. The data was gathered from 33 general hospitals in Japan.

All participants reported their average daily amount of standardised alcohol units and the duration of drinking. One standardised drink containing 23 grams of ethanol was equivalent to one 180-ml cup of Japanese sake, one 500-ml bottle of beer, one 180-ml glass of wine, or one 60-ml cup of whiskey.

Drink, Alcohol, Cup, Whiskey, The Drink
If you thought one-two drinks a day would not do any harm, think again. Researchers in Japan have found that even light alcohol consumption might increase the cancer risk. Pixabay

The researchers found an almost linear association between cancer risk and alcohol consumption. A light level of drinking at 10-drink-year point, for example, one drink per day for 10 years or two drinks per day for five years would increase cancer risk by five per cent, the findings showed.

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Those who drank two or fewer drinks a day had an elevated cancer risk regardless of how long they had consumed alcohol. Also, analyses classified by sex, drinking/smoking behaviours and occupational class mostly showed the same patterns. (IANS)