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Seventh Batch of Pilgrims leave Jammu for Amarnath Yatra

The seventh batch of pilgrims which consists of 1748 men, 401 women, and 97 sadhus and sadhvis has left for Amarnath

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Amarnath Cave Shrine
Pilgrimage to the Amarnath Yatra. Wikimedia
  • The seventh batch of pilgrims have departed for their journey to Amarnath Cave Shrine
  • This batch consists of 2,246 pilgrims including 1748 men, 401 women and 97 sadhus and sadhvis 
  • With the departure of the seventh batch, total 25,294 pilgrims have left for Amarnath from Jammu

July 08, 2017: The seventh batch of pilgrims left Jammu on June 7, for their journey to reach Amarnath’s Cave shrine for a darshan of ice lingam. With this batch, the total number of pilgrims has reached 25,294.

This batch is made up of 1748 men, 401 women, and 97 sadhus and sadhvis. The Amarnath yatra began on June 28 from Jammu. The journey is to be done amid multi-tier security with CRPF escorting the pilgrims. The final destination is the twin base camp of Amarnath cave shrine.

10,461 pilgrims paid obeisance at the Holy Cave yesterday, however, lives of 3 pilgrims was claimed. The total death toll number for the ongoing pilgrimage has reached 9.

Also Read: Stones Instead of Cash? Devotees send Stones from Rajasthan for Ram Temple in Ayodhya

A staggering number of 1,15,841 pilgrims have made the journey to visit the ice lingam since the beginning of the pilgrimage. The annual yatra, this year too, has continued despite the terror threats. But it has prompted the authorities to be alert and prepared. The highest level of security measures have been adopted, including the latest satellite tracking system, mentioned PTI report.

Earlier an intelligence source has revealed that the militants have planned to target policemen and the many yatris. The CRPF, BSF, police, and army have all been instructed to secure the pilgrimage. Combined, over 40,000 troops have been mobilized to provide for the security.

Additionally, the center has provided the state with 25,000 personnel. This year’s Amarnath yatra is 8 days shorter than last year’s 48 days.

– prepared by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

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HPV Vaccination May Bring An End To Cervical Cancer In India by 2070

Combining high uptake of the HPV vaccine and cervical screening could eliminate cervical cancer as a public health hazard in 149 out of 181 countries by 2100 and up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050.

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cancer
Cervical cancer is the fourth-most common cancer among women, with an estimated 570,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018, of which around 85 per cent occur in less developed nations. Pixabay

Human papillomavirus (HPV) screening and vaccination must be taken up on a war footing in countries like India to prevent 15 million cervical cancer deaths among women by 2050, a Lancet research said.

Causing the second-highest number of deaths among Indian women among cancer variants, cervical cancer, in a majority of cases, is caused by HPV, a group of more than 150 viruses.

The efforts might even result in cervical cancer being eliminated as a public health hazard in India by 2070-79, according to the study, published in The Lancet Oncology journal.

Combining high uptake of the HPV vaccine and cervical screening could eliminate cervical cancer as a public health hazard in 149 out of 181 countries by 2100 and up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050.

Cancer
“Awareness about cervical cancer is extremely poor among common people; that makes containing the disease a challenge,” Anjila Aneja, Director at Fortis La Femme, New Delhi, told IANS. Pixabay

If the high coverage of HPV vaccination and cervical screening cannot be achieved globally, over 44 million women could be diagnosed with cervical cancer in the next 50 years with two-thirds of these cases and an additional estimated 15 million deaths, would occur in countries with low and medium levels of development.

“More than two thirds of cases prevented would be in countries with low and medium levels of human development like India, Nigeria, and Malawi, where there has so far been limited access to HPV vaccination or cervical screening,” said lead author Professor Karen Canfell from the Cancer Council New South Wales in Australia.

However, large disparities exist in cervical screening and HPV vaccination coverage among countries.

“Awareness about cervical cancer is extremely poor among common people; that makes containing the disease a challenge,” Anjila Aneja, Director at Fortis La Femme, New Delhi, told IANS.

“While societal barriers prevent women from seeking medical help in advance, women are forced to come out at a later stage when the disease has reached an advanced stage,” she said.

cancer
Screening and broad-spectrum HPV vaccines could potentially prevent up to 84-90 per cent of cervical cancers, the study said. Pixabay

However, Canfell says that despite the enormity of the problem, their findings suggest that “global elimination is within reach with tools that are already available, provided that both high coverage of HPV vaccination and cervical screening can be achieved.

Cervical cancer is the fourth-most common cancer among women, with an estimated 570,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018, of which around 85 per cent occur in less developed nations.

Screening and broad-spectrum HPV vaccines could potentially prevent up to 84-90 per cent of cervical cancers, the study said.

Also Read: Indian IT Act Silent On Social Media’s Manipulative Role
“Diagnostic tests such as the pap smear are effective in identifying cancerous tendencies.

“However, these tests are available with a limited number of providers and largely within the cities. This makes screening sporadic and leaves out women who live in rural areas,” Aneja added. (IANS)