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Pilibhit Tiger Reserve in Uttar Pradesh to Sow Aromatic Plants on Its Boundaries to Prevent Tiger Attacks

This puts a break on man-animal conflict

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Pilibhit, Tiger, Reserve
According to Naresh Kumar, senior WWF project director, herbivorous animals like deer, wild pigs and blue bulls do not eat aromatic plants and because they do not come into the area where aromatic plants are present. Pixabay

The Pilibhit Tiger Reserve (PTR) in Uttar Pradesh will sow aromatic plants on its boundaries to prevent tiger attacks on human population.

According to Naresh Kumar, senior WWF project director, herbivorous animals like deer, wild pigs and blue bulls do not eat aromatic plants and because they do not come into the area where aromatic plants are present, tiger do not follow them. This puts a break on man-animal conflict.

Farmers in the villages of Dhakka, Chant, Khirkia, Bargadia and Dhuria Palia, around the PTR have already started experimenting by planting lemon grass, poppy, palm rose and geranium.

All these are cash crops which yield better results for farmers.

Pilibhit, Tiger, Reserve
The Pilibhit Tiger Reserve (PTR) in Uttar Pradesh will sow aromatic plants on its boundaries to prevent tiger attacks on human population. Pixabay

Forest officials are taking help from the National Bank of Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) and the Agricultural Science Centres to create awareness among farmers and provide seeds and other information regarding cultivation of aromatic plants.

An agriculture scientist said that the best thing about aromatic plants is that they give three crops in a year which makes them highly profitable. The harvesting months for these crops are March, June and October.

At present, sugarcane is the major crop in the area and wild pigs and blue bulls come into the fields and destroy the crops. Their presence also invite tigers into the area.

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In the past one year, eight farmers have lost their lives in tiger attacks. Recently, one tiger was beaten to death by the local people when the animal attacked a farmer. (IANS)

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Doubling of India’s Tiger Population Between 2006 and 2019 a “Good Sign”

So, it's always a good sign if endangered species are, in fact, being protected, Haq told reporters on Tuesday.

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We have a Sustainable Development Goal which encourages the preservation of biodiversity and of all species including, in particular, those that are endangered. Pixabay

The doubling of India’s tiger population between 2006 and 2019 is being welcomed as a “good sign” by Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, according to his Deputy Spokesperson Farhan Haq.

“We have a Sustainable Development Goal which encourages the preservation of biodiversity and of all species including, in particular, those that are endangered. So, it’s always a good sign if endangered species are, in fact, being protected,” Haq told reporters on Tuesday.

On Monday, Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced that the nation’s tiger population had reached 2,967.

India, Tiger, Population
The doubling of India’s tiger population between 2006 and 2019 is being welcomed as a “good sign” by Secretary-General Antonio Guterres. Pixabay

He asserted that India had reached the goal of doubling the endangered animal’s population four years ahead of the target year of 2022 set in 2010 at a meeting of countries that are home to the animal.

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He said: “I feel it is possible to strike a healthy balance between development and environment. In our policies, in our economics, we have to change the conversation about conservation.” (IANS)