Sunday July 22, 2018
Home India Sainik School...

Sainik School Model to be Incorporated in Non-Military Schools, suggests Prime Minister’s Office to HRD

The elements of military school training the PMO wants to introduce in regular schools include discipline, physical training and ‘patriotic sentiments’

0
//
108
Sainik school
Two Army T-55 Tanks dedicated to Sainik School, Korukonda. Wikimedia
Republish
Reprint
  • PMO advised HRD ministry to include elements of a Sainik school in regular school
  • The inclusion of elements will incorporate “holistic development” of students
  • Kendriya Vidyalayas and Jawahar Navodaya Vidyalayas will have Sainik school like features

July 21, 2017: The Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) has advised the HRD Ministry to include elements of a military school in regular schools too. This will incorporate discipline, physical fitness, and patriotism in non-military schools. The PMO has suggested the inclusion of such elements in all schools for “holistic development” of students. According to a report, the meeting on Tuesday, July 18 was called out by the PMO to discuss the proposal with Senior HRD officials.

The idea of introducing military elements in schools was first introduced under the NDA government at a meeting of the Central Advisory Board of Education (highest government advisory body on education) held in October last year. In the meeting, Mahendra Nath Pandey, Minister of state for HRD accentuated the importance of military education for students to promote the idea of patriotism and nationalism, mentioned Indian Express report.

He further adds,  if 2,000 of the 10,000 students at Nalanda University were trained in military education, they would have foiled “Bakhtiyar Khilji’s plan” to plunder and raze the institute.

Sainik Schools were established in 1961 by the then Defence Minister V K Krishna Menon with the purpose of preparing youngsters for the defense services.

[bctt tweet=”Sainik Schools were established in 1961 to prepare youngsters for the defense services. ” username=”NewsGramdotcom”]

The HRD ministry is exploring new ways to introduce Sainik School like features in Kendriya Vidyalayas (KVs) and Jawahar Navodaya Vidyalayas (JNVs), which are also residential school. The PMO’s suggestion was also discussed with the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE).

ALSO READ: Five boarding schools which teach Army training in India

Students at these residential schools have to join the National Cadet Corps (NCC), undergo rigorous physical training and adopt patriotic lives. The Ministry of Defence directs 25 such schools.

Stressing on the binding need for nationalism and patriotism in CABE meeting, Madhya Pradesh’s education minister also affirmed that more Sainik Schools should be set up by the government.

-Prepared by Staff writer at Newsgram

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

CBSE Over Errors In NEET Question Paper Summoned By Madras High Court

The judges had also criticised the CBSE

0
CBSE Over NEET Question Paper Errors Summoned By Madras High Court
CBSE Over NEET Question Paper Errors Summoned By Madras High Court. Flickr

The Madras High Court Bench here today came down heavily on the CBSE observing that it was being autocratic in the matter related to errors in the Tamil version of this year’s National Eligibility cum Entrance Test.

A bench of justices C T Selvam and A M Basheer Ahamed made the observation while hearing a public interest litigation filed by CPI-M leader T K Rangarajan, seeking award of full marks for 49 ‘erroneous’ questions in the Tamil version of the NEET.

It said that despite knowing that a PIL on the matter was filed and it was due for hearing, the CBSE had released the results.

“Why did they do so?”, the court asked.

Referring to the CBSE’s submission, the bench said, “How do you decide the right answers for the questions based on majority view? CBSE is accepting even wrong answers under the pretext of majority decision. How is that in Bihar state so many students got through the examination?” it asked.

Later, it adjourned the hearing on the PIL without mentioning any date.

The petitioner has submitted that key words in the Tamil questions were wrongly translated from English and this caused confusion for the students.

In the previous hearing, the court had asked the CBSE to file an affidavit stating among others on whether any exercise was undertaken to ascertain which of the English words in the syllabi for science subjects were incapable of being reproduced in an equivalent word in Tamil.

Madras High court, walk in room
Madras High court, walk in room. flickr

Also read: Woman Can Have Husband’s Salary Information: MP High Court

The judges had also criticised the CBSE saying that the mistakes in the question paper were not mere ambiguity. (IANS)