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Politics
by ians

Taliban have mandated the segregation of genders in classrooms and said that female students, lecturers and employees must wear hijabs in accordance with the group's interpretation of Sharia law.

Afghan women around the world are protesting the Taliban's new hijab diktat in schools by posting photos of themselves wearing colorful traditional dresses on social media, CNN reported.

The Taliban have mandated the segregation of genders in classrooms and said that female students, lecturers and employees must wear hijabs in accordance with the group's interpretation of Sharia law. Photos have emerged of a group of female students wearing head-to-toe black robes and waving Taliban flags in the lecture hall of a government-run university in Kabul. Other Afghan women responded by posting pictures of themselves in bright and colorful traditional Afghan dresses -- a stark contrast to the black hijab mandate outlined by the Taliban.

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Country sheep standing at an outpost

Nursery rhymes are a tool used by education institutions to teach language, stories, composition, and imaginations. Little children are often found crooning these little verses at random occasions. At first glance, these rhymes certainly appear quite random, but there is a rather dark history to their origin.

'Baa Baa Black Sheep' was written in the time of the Trans-Atlantic Slave , at the time when colonization was a fully established movement in many parts of the world. Children in Britain began to sing it in 1879, interestingly, to the same tune as 'Twinkle Twinkle Little Star' and 'Alphabet Song'.

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Remains of houses burnt after Myanmar soldiers in Kin Ma village, Pauk Township, in Myanmar's Magway region

Myanmar troops killed several members of a local "defense force" in a day of clashes, the junta said Friday, with local residents and media reporting at least 10 dead.

The country has been in turmoil since a February coup and a military crackdown on dissent that has killed more than 1,000 people, according to a local monitoring group.

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Women protesting for passing theWomen’s Reservation Bill.

On 12 September 1996, a speech took place in the Lok Sabha of the Indian parliament, wherein it was introduced that from now on, one-third of seats will be reserved for women in the Lok Sabha and state legislative assemblies. But, when we look at the present scenario of women representation in the Indian parliament, it is evident how the Women's Reservation Bill exists only on paper and is yet to become operational

Even an analysis was done by the PRS Legislative Research, and it showed that less than fifteen percent of the women are a part of the Lok Sabha and state legislative assemblies. Moreover, it is understood that when there is less representation of women in the legislative bodies, then its impact is directly seen on the country's decision making and policy framing.

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