Monday July 23, 2018
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Poor dental health linked to diabetes risk

The differences in the average number of missing teeth among the three glucose tolerance groups were significant

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Poor dental health may lead to risk of diabetes. Pixabay
Poor dental health may lead to risk of diabetes. Pixabay
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  • Poor dental health may lead to Diabetes
  • A dental examination may provide a way to identify the risk of diabetes
  • It is all connected to the glucose tolerance of a person

You may be at an increased risk of diabetes if you are not taking care of your dental health, warns a new study which suggests that dental examination may provide a way to identify the risk for developing the disease.

“We found a progressive positive relationship between worsening glucose tolerance and the number of missing teeth,” said lead author Raynald Samoa from the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California.

Teeth sensitivity may cause severe pain, therefore treating it as early as possible is a must
Poor dental health can increase the risk of diabetes. Wikimedia Commons

For the study, presented at the ENDO 2018: The Endocrine Society’s 100th Annual Meeting and Expo, researchers reviewed the records of 9,670 adults with 20 years of age and above who were examined by dentists during the 2009-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

They analysed their reported body mass index (BMI) and glucose tolerance states by fasting plasma glucose, two-hour post-challenge plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), established diabetes and whether the condition was treated with oral agents or insulin.

Also Read: Night Shifts May Raise Risk Of Diabetes

The researchers recorded the numbers of missing teeth due to caries, or cavities, and periodontal disease for individual patients. They also determined the relationship between glucose tolerance and dental condition by considering age, gender, racial and ethnic group, family history of diabetes, smoking status, alcohol consumption, education and poverty index.

The researchers found a progressive increase in the number of patients with missing teeth as glucose tolerance declined, from 45.57 per cent in the group with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), to 67.61 per cent in the group with abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT), to 82.87 per cent in the group with diabetes mellitus (DM).

Type 1 Diabetes
The risk of diabetes is connected to dental health via glucose tolerance.

The differences in the average number of missing teeth among the three glucose tolerance groups were significant: 2.26 in the NGT group, 4.41 in the AGT group and 6.80 in those with DM, the researchers noted. IANS

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Diabetes? Living Near Woods May Cut Risk of Elevated Blood Sugar

The researchers hope that the findings will prompt doctors and other healthcare professionals to recommend patients to spend more time in greenery and natural areas

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Spending more time with nature also increased sleep duration and significantly reduced the levels of salivary cortisol -- a physiological marker of stress.
Spending more time with nature also increased sleep duration and significantly reduced the levels of salivary cortisol -- a physiological marker of stress. Pixabay

Feeling unwell? Instead of popping up a pill, sitting in the lap of nature can have various health benefits, says a study.

The findings showed that living near the nature or getting regular exposure to greenery may reduce the risk of a host of illnesses including Type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, high blood pressure, preterm birth and stress — and boost overall health.

“We often reach for medication when we’re unwell but exposure to health-promoting environments is increasingly recognized as both preventing and helping treat disease. Our study shows that the size of these benefits can be enough to have a meaningful clinical impact,” said Andy Jones from Britain’s University of East Anglia (UEA).

“People living near greenery likely have more opportunities for physical activity and socializing. Meanwhile, exposure to a diverse variety of bacteria present in natural areas may also have benefits for the immune system and reduce inflammation,” said lead author, Caoimhe Twohig-Bennett from UEA’s Norwich Medical School.

Health-boosting properties of forest bathing can be explained by Phytoncides, which are organic compounds with antibacterial properties, released by trees, the researchers said.
Health-boosting properties of forest bathing can be explained by Phytoncides, which are organic compounds with antibacterial properties, released by trees, the researchers said. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Environmental Research, the team studied data from over 140 studies involving more than 290 million people from 20 countries including the UK, the US, Spain, France, Germany, Australia and Japan.

Spending more time with nature also increased sleep duration and significantly reduced the levels of salivary cortisol — a physiological marker of stress.

Also Read: Air Pollution Linked to 3.2 Million New Diabetes Cases in One Year

The researchers hope that the findings will prompt doctors and other healthcare professionals to recommend patients to spend more time in greenery and natural areas.

“We hope that this research will inspire people to get outside more and feel the health benefits for themselves. Hopefully our results will encourage policymakers to invest in the creation, regeneration, and maintenance of parks and greenery, particularly in urban residential areas,” Twohig-Bennett noted. (IANS)

One response to “Diabetes? Living Near Woods May Cut Risk of Elevated Blood Sugar”

  1. Bad sugar. I found out I had type 2. I had no idea what to do or how I was going to eat. I did know that I was very motivated not to take medication. Then I read a diabetes story (google ” How I Freed Myself From Diabetes ” ) Eight weeks later I have lost 35 pounds and am not taking any medication and have a blood glucose reading that averages 105. The first few days saw an immediate change. I went from a blood glucose reading of 314 to 143 in three days. I immediately started shedding weight without exercise.