Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Poor Diet and food style adds up to the increased deaths due to heart diseases. Unsplash

Poor diet is a top contributor to heart disease deaths around the globe, say, researchers, adding that more than two-thirds of the deaths from heart disease worldwide could be prevented with healthier diets.

The findings, published in the European Heart Journal, highlights the importance of affordable and sustainable healthy diets for all.


“Our analysis shows that unhealthy diets, high blood pressure, and high serum cholesterol are the top three contributors to deaths from heart attacks and angina – collectively called ischaemic heart disease,” said study author Xinyao Liu from the Central South University in China.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook to stay updated.

“This was consistent in both developed and developing countries,” Liu added.

For the results, the research team analyzed data provided by the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017, which was conducted in 195 countries between 1990 and 2017.

In 2017, there were 126.5 million individuals living with ischaemic heart disease, and 10.6 million new diagnoses of the condition.


Tobacco use ranked as the fourth highest contributor to ischaemic heart disease deaths in men but only seventh in women. Unsplash

Ischaemic heart disease caused 8.9 million deaths in 2017, which equates to 16 percent of all deaths, compared with 12.6 percent of all deaths in 1990.

The investigators calculated the impact of 11 risk factors on death from ischaemic heart disease.

These were diet, high blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, high plasma glucose, tobacco use, high body mass index (BMI), air pollution, low physical activity, impaired kidney function, lead exposure, and alcohol use.

Follow NewsGram on Instagram to keep yourself updated.

Specifically, they estimated the proportion of deaths that could be stopped by eliminating that risk factor.

Assuming all other risk factors remained unchanged, 69.2 percent of ischaemic heart disease deaths worldwide could be prevented if healthier diets were adopted.

Meanwhile, 54.4 percent of these deaths could be avoided if systolic blood pressure was kept at 110-115 mmHg.

Tobacco use ranked as the fourth highest contributor to ischaemic heart disease deaths in men but only seventh in women.

Also Read: WhatsApp: Users Can Directly Report Bugs And Issues In The App

The findings also showed that a high body mass index (BMI) was the fifth-highest contributor to ischaemic heart disease deaths in women and sixth in men.

‘Every day we should aim for 200 to 300 grams of fruit, 290 to 430 grams of vegetables, 16 to 25 grams of nuts, and 100 to 150 grams of whole grains,” the researchers wrote. (IANS)


Popular

VOA

Facebook, Whatsapp and Instagram logos are displayed in this illustration taken October 4, 2021.

Facebook says it plans to hire 10,000 workers in the European Union over the next five years to work on a new computing platform.

The company said in a blog post Sunday that those high-skilled workers will help build "the metaverse," a futuristic notion for connecting people online that encompasses augmented and virtual reality.

Keep Reading Show less
Wikimedia Commons

The most popular version of the rhyme/lullaby

As children, singing the rhyme Rock A Bye Baby was a fun thing to do. It was a statement of thrill and adventure to imagine a child climbing to the top of a tree and rocking to sleep. Especially in the Indian context, rocking a baby to sleep by attaching the cradle to the tree is quite a common thing. But the origin of this rhyme, or lullaby, seems rooted in other histories.

The most popular notion associated with this lullaby is of women leaving their babies tied to tree branches, rocking to sleep with the wind. It is believed that at the time this lullaby was written, it was inspired by a coloniser who saw the Native American women tie their children in birch bark cradles to the trees. The babies went to sleep rocked by the gusts of wind while the parents went about their tasks.

Keep Reading Show less
VOA

This image released by Disney Theatrical Productions shows, from second left, Michael James Scott as Genie, Michael Maliakel as Aladdin, and Shoba Narayan as Jasmine after a performance of the Broadway musical "Aladdin" in New York on Sept. 28, 2021

As kids growing up in different states, Shoba Narayan and Michael Maliakel shared a love of one favorite film — "Aladdin." Both are of Indian descent, and in the animated movie, they saw people who looked like them.

That shared love has gone full-circle this month as Narayan and Maliakel lead the Broadway company of the musical "Aladdin" out of the pandemic, playing Princess Jasmine and the hero from the title, respectively.

Keep reading... Show less