Tuesday November 19, 2019

Poor Posture can Lead to Chronic Pain

It was mainly pain in my upper back and neck and shoulder area," he said. "It was just on the one side

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Posture, Pain, Cellphones
FILE - People work on laptops in a reading room at the British Library in London, June 20, 2011. VOA

Cellphones and computers are everywhere in almost every country across the globe, and it is common to see people hunched over these devices. Posture.

When Dr. Lushantha Gunasekera at Orlando Health began feeling back pain, he thought he needed strength training.

“It was mainly pain in my upper back and neck and shoulder area,” he said. “It was just on the one side.”

Nathaniel Melendez, a fitness specialist at the Orlando Health gym, was certain the doctor’s pain was from poor posture.

Posture, Pain, Cellphones
When Dr. Lushantha Gunasekera at Orlando Health began feeling back pain, he thought he needed strength training. Pixabay

“The internally rotated shoulders, the rounded back, head is down, neck is down,” he said, describing what he saw in Gunasekera.

Hunching over a computer screen or cellphone compresses the neck muscles, which causes fatigue, muscle tension and headaches, and can injure vertebrae, Melendez says, but adds that it can be prevented and corrected.

“You’d be surprised what strengthening your core and doing postural corrective exercises can do for your body,” he said.

Melendez says even a slight misalignment can cause major strain, but researchers at Orlando Health found that less than half the Americans they surveyed seemed to care — until the pain sets in.

Also Read- Researchers Develop a Software that Turns Smartphone into Portable AR Device

As for Gunasekera, he says changing his posture made a huge difference.

“It’s really helped out,” he said. “Now, I don’t have pain there anymore.”

Experts advise computer users who are seated to be at eye level with the screen. Cellphone and computer users are encouraged to take frequent breaks and to remain aware of their posture. (VOA)

Next Story

Passive Presence of a Romantic Partner Can Reduce Pain: Researchers

Partner empathy was positively associated with pain tolerance and inversely associated with sensory pain experience

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Night-owl women not for long-term relationships: Study
In stress? Remember your romantic partner and keep BP down. pixabay

Researchers have found that the passive presence of a romantic partner can reduce pain and that partner empathy may buffer affective distress during pain exposure.

The study, published in the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, confirmed the analgesic effects of social support — even without verbal or physical contact.

The research team assessed sensitivity to pressure pain in 48 heterosexual couples with each participant tested alone and in the passive presence of their partner.

Dispositional empathy was quantified by a questionnaire.

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Most importantly when your partner decides to confess, instead of attacking him/her, show your empathy and try to solve the issue. Pixabay

In the presence, as compared to the absence, of their partners both men and women exhibited higher pain thresholds and tolerance as well as lower sensory and affective pain ratings on constant pressure stimuli.

Partner empathy was positively associated with pain tolerance and inversely associated with sensory pain experience.

Also Read: This is How Your Brain Senses an itch

“Repeatedly, talking and touching have been shown to reduce pain, but our research shows that even the passive presence of a romantic partner can reduce it and that partner empathy may buffer affective distress during pain exposure,” said Stefan Duschek, Professor at UMIT in Austria. (IANS)