Wednesday January 22, 2020

Poor Sexual Health More Common in Women: Study

Poor sexual health more common in women than men

0
//
Sexual Health
Poor sexual health is more common in women and affects them in more diverse ways than men. Pixabay

Researchers have found that poor sexual health is more common in women and affects them in more diverse ways than men.

According to the study, published in the journal BMC Public Health, out of 12,132 men and women included in the research, 17 per cent of men and 47.5 per cent of women in the UK reported poor sex health.

“Sexual health is an umbrella term that covers several different health risks, such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs), unplanned pregnancy, function problems and sexual coercion,” said study lead author Alison Parkes from the University of Glasgow in the UK.

“A greater understanding of how these risks are patterned across the population is needed to improve the targeting and delivery of sexual health programmes,” Parkes added.

Sexual Health
According to the study, published in the journal BMC Public Health, out of 12,132 men and women included in the research, 17 per cent of men and 47.5 per cent of women in the UK reported poor sexual health. Pixabay

To get a better idea of how sexual health varies within the UK population, a team of researchers investigated patterns of health markers, such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or sexual function problems, in 12,132 sexually active men and women, aged 16-74 from England, Scotland and Wales, who were interviewed between 2010 and 2012.

They also examined associations of sexual health with socio-demographic, health and lifestyle characteristics, as well as with satisfaction or distress with a person’s sex life.

Based on markers of sexual health that were most common in different groups of people, the researchers identified sexual health classes, four of which were common to both men and women; Good Sexual Health (83 per cent of men, 52 per cent of women), Wary Risk-takers (four per cent of men, two per cent of women), Unwary Risk-takers ( four per cent of men, seven per cent women), and Sexual Function Problems (nine per cent of men, seven per cent of women).

Two additional sexual health classed were identified in women only; a Low Sexual Interest class which included 29 per cent of women and a Highly Vulnerable class, reporting a range of adverse experiences across all markers of sexual health, which included two per cent of women.

Highly Vulnerable women were more likely to report an abortion than all other female sexual health classes except unwary risk takers, and most likely to report STIs, the study said.

“We identified several groups who are not well served by current sexual health intervention efforts: men and women disregarding STI risks, women with a low interest in sex feeling distressed or dissatisfied with their sex lives, and women with multiple health problems,” she said.

Also Read- Shoppers More Likely to Purchase Commodities Through Smartphone This Year: Report

However, the researchers also noticed that poor sexual health groups had certain characteristics in common.

They were generally more likely to have started having sex before the age of 16; and to experience depression, alcohol or drug use, the research said. (IANS)

Next Story

Premature Menopause More Likely to Increase Health Problems After 60

Compared with women who experienced menopause at the age of 50-51 years, women with premature menopause were twice as likely to develop multimorbidity by the age of 60, and three times as likely to develop multimorbidity from the age of 60 onwards

0
Bone Health
Women who have already been through menopause may experience problems related to their bone health. Lifetime Stock

Women who experience premature menopause are almost three times more likely to develop multiple, chronic medical problems in their 60s, says a new study.

It is known already that premature menopause, occurring at the age of 40 or younger, is linked to a number of individual medical problems in later life, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

However, there is little information about whether there is also an association between the time of natural menopause and the development of multiple medical conditions known as multimorbidity.

For the findings, published in the journal Human Reproduction, researchers at the University of Queensland followed more than 5,000 women aged 45 to 50 from 1996 until 2016.

“We found that 71 per cent of women with premature menopause had developed multimorbidity by the age of 60 compared with 55 per cent of women who experienced menopause at the age of 50-51,” said study researcher Xiaolin Xu from Zhejiang University in China.

“In addition, 45 per cent of women with premature menopause had developed multimorbidity in their 60s compared with 40 per cent of women who experienced menopause at the age of 50-51,” Xu added.

The women responded to the first survey in 1996 and then answered questionnaires every three years (apart from a two-year interval between the first and second survey) until 2016.

Sexual Dysfunction increases by nearly 30 per cent during perimenopause and vaginal dryness most often has the greatest effect on desire, arousal and overall satisfaction, Here are some Causes. Wikimedia Commons

The women reported whether they had been diagnosed with or treated for any of 11 health problems in the past three years: diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, osteoporosis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression, anxiety or breast cancer.

Women were considered to have multimorbidity if they had two or more of these conditions.

During the 20 years of follow-up, 2.3 per cent of women experienced premature menopause and 55 per cent developed multimorbidity.

Also Read: Twitterati Report Server, Media Transfer Issues on WhatsApp

Compared with women who experienced menopause at the age of 50-51 years, women with premature menopause were twice as likely to develop multimorbidity by the age of 60, and three times as likely to develop multimorbidity from the age of 60 onwards.

“Our findings indicate that multimorbidity is common in mid-aged and early-elderly women,” said Indian-origin researcher and study senior author Gita Mishra.

“We also found that premature menopause is associated with a higher incidence of individual chronic conditions,” Xu added. (IANS)