Sunday December 8, 2019

Poor Work Productivity In Men Linked To Erectile Dysfunction

Research reveals that ED patients have lower measures of health-related quality of life

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erectile dysfunction
Men suffering from erectile dysfunction have to face several health issues, research reveals. Pixabay

Men suffering from erectile dysfunction (ED) are more likely to be less productive at work and maintain a lower health-related quality of life, says a study.

The study, published in the International Journal of Clinical Practice, showed that erectile dysfunction in men significantly impacts work productivity and adversely affects the quality of life.

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is defined as the persistent inability to achieve and/or maintain penile erection sufficient for performing sexual intercourse.

For the study, the researchers analysed data of more than 52,000 men aged between 40 to 70 years from eight countries — Brazil, China, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the UK and the US.

Erectile dysfunction
Erectile dysfunction can lead to less productivity and lethargic feeling in men. Pixabay

The study showed that the overall ED prevalence was 49.7 per cent, with Italy reporting the highest rate (54.7 per cent).

Men with ED reported significantly higher rates of staying home from work (7.1 per cent versus 3.2 per cent), working while sick (22.5 per cent versus 10.1 per cent), work productivity impairment (24.8 per cent versus 11.2 per cent), and activity impairment (28.6 per cent versus 14.5 per cent) than men without ED.

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They also had lower measures of health-related quality of life. “This study shows that ED remains a prevalent concern, one that impacts work productivity and absenteeism,” said co-author Wing Yu Tang, a researcher from Pfizer Inc, New York.

The researchers suggested that better management and earlier detection may help reduce this burden, especially in comparative countries where there is a strong association between erectile dysfunction and these implications for the workplace and overall quality of life. (IANS)

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Air Pollution Identified as a Life-threatening Illness: Study

"Our knowledge of the health effects of PM is still lacking in many areas," said researchers at the University of Southampton in UK

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health, air pollution, patna, India, national concern
Officials of CEED highlighted the fact that health must be the central point or focus for any kind of action on air pollution. Pixabay

Health related problems linked to air pollution could be far higher than previously thought, as researchers have found that short term exposure to fine particulate matter in the air (known as PM2.5) is associated with several newly identified causes of hospital admissions, even at levels below international air quality guidelines.

Air pollution has for the first time been linked life-threatening illnesses – including sepsis, kidney failure and urinary tract infections, according to the study published in the journal The BMJ.

The study also confirms several previously established causes of hospital admission associated with short term exposure to PM2.5 including heart and lung diseases, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, and diabetes.

These associations remained even when the analysis was restricted to days when the PM2.5 concentration was below the WHO air quality guideline.

“Discovered several new causes of hospital admissions associated with short term exposure to PM2.5 and confirmed several already known associations, even at daily PM2.5 concentrations below the current WHO guideline,” said study researchers from Harvard Chan School of Public Health in US.

“Economic analysis suggests that even a small increase in short term exposure to PM2.5 is associated with substantial economic effect,” the added.

The researchers also suggest that the World Health Organization (WHO) air quality guidelines need revising.

Barcelona, Deaths, Air Pollution
FILE – Pollution and clouds are seen over the sky of Barcelona, Spain, July 25, 2019. VOA

For the findings, the research team analysed more than 95 million Medicare hospital insurance claims for adults aged 65 or older in the US from 2000 to 2012.

Causes of hospital admission were classified into 214 mutually exclusive disease groups and these were linked with estimated daily exposure to PM2.5 based on data from the US Environmental Protection Agency.

The researchers then estimated the increased risk of admission and the corresponding costs associated with a 1 ug/m3 increase in short term exposure to PM2.5 for each disease group.

They found that each 1 ug/m3 increase in PM2.5 was associated with 2,050 extra hospital admissions, 12,216 days in hospital, and $31m (£24m, €28m) in care costs for diseases not previously associated with PM2.5 including sepsis, kidney failure, urinary tract and skin infections.

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The researchers point to some study limitations, such as being unable to fully capture costs after discharge, or take account of other factors that could trigger hospital admission, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and drug use.

However, strengths include the large sample size over a 13-year period and results that remained similar after further analyses, suggesting that they are robust.

“Our knowledge of the health effects of PM is still lacking in many areas,” said researchers at the University of Southampton in UK. (IANS)