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Positive Social Relationships Can Develop Self-Esteem in People

While earlier research had yielded inconsistent findings, the meta-analysis supports the classic and contemporary theories of the influence of self-esteem on social connections

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Social Relationships
Study found that positive Social Relationships, social support and social acceptance help shape the development of self-esteem in people over time across ages four to 76. Pixabay

Researchers have found that positive Social Relationships, support and acceptance helps shape the development of self-esteem in people.

“For the first time, we have a systematic answer to a key question in the field of self-esteem research: Whether and to what extent a person’s social relationships influence his or her self-esteem development, and vice versa, and at what ages,” said study author Michelle A. Harris from the University of Texas.

“The answer to what age groups are across the life span,” Harris said.

For the study, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, researchers analysed 52 studies involving more than 47,000 participants (54 per cent female) looking at either the effect of self-esteem on social relationships overtime or the reverse effect.

The studies, all published between 1992 and 2016, included multiple countries like 30 samples from the US, four from Switzerland, three from Germany, two each from Australia, Belgium, Canada, Finland, Greece, Russia and Sweden.

Samples ranged from early childhood to late adulthood.

The authors found that positive social relationships, social support and social acceptance help shape the development of self-esteem in people over time across ages four to 76.

Social Relationships
Researchers have found that positive Social Relationships, support and acceptance helps shape the development of self-esteem in people. Pixabay

They also found a significant effect in the reverse direction.

While earlier research had yielded inconsistent findings, the meta-analysis supports the classic and contemporary theories of the influence of self-esteem on social connections and the influence of social connections on self-esteem, said the researchers.

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The findings were the same after accounting for gender and ethnicity. (IANS)

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Dine Alone To Cut Your Food Intake And Get in Shape: Study

The researchers called the phenomenon of eating more with friends and family "social facilitation"

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Dine
The researchers found that people Dine more with friends and family Than When They are alone because having food with others is more enjoyable and social eating could increase consumption. Pixabay

 If you are planning to cut down on your daily food intake to get into shape, better Dine alone as a new research has found that people tend to eat more with friends and family.

Eating “socially” has a powerful effect on increasing food intake relative to dining alone, said the study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

“We found strong evidence that people eat more food when dining with friends and family than when alone,” said research leader Helen Ruddock from the University of Birmingham in Britain.

Previous studies found that those eating with others ate up to 48 per cent more food than solo diners and women with obesity eating socially consumed up to 29 per cent more than when eating alone.

For the study, the researchers evaluated 42 existing studies of research into social dining.

The researchers found that people eat more with friends and family because having food with others is more enjoyable and social eating could increase consumption.

Social norms might ‘permit’ overeating in company but sanction it when eating alone and providing food becomes associated with praise and recognition from friends and family, strengthening social bonds.

The researchers called the phenomenon of eating more with friends and family “social facilitation”.

Dine
If you are planning to cut down on your daily food intake to get into shape, better Dine alone as a new research has found that people tend to eat more with friends and family. Pixabay

They found that this social facilitation effect on eating was not observed across studies which had looked at food intake amongst people who were not well acquainted.

“People want to convey positive impressions to strangers. Selecting small portions may provide a means of doing so and this may be why the social facilitation of eating is less pronounced amongst groups of strangers,” Ruddock said.

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The researchers explained that ancient hunter gatherers shared food because it ensured equitable food distribution.

In the case of social facilitation, we have inherited a mechanism that now exerts a powerful influence on unhealthy dietary intakes, the researchers said. (IANS)