Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Home Life Style Health & Fitness Positive Social Relationships Help Increase Self-Esteem

Positive Social Relationships Help Increase Self-Esteem

Researchers have found that positive social relationships, support and acceptance helps shape the development of self-esteem

Researchers have found that positive social relationships, support and acceptance helps shape the development of self-esteem in people.

“For the first time, we have a systematic answer to a key question in the field of self-esteem research: Whether and to what extent a person’s social relationships influence his or her self-esteem development, and vice versa, and at what ages,” said study author Michelle A. Harris from the University of Texas.

“The answer to what age groups are across the life span,” Harris said.

For the study, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, researchers analysed 52 studies involving more than 47,000 participants (54 per cent female) looking at either the effect of self-esteem on social relationships overtime or the reverse effect.

The studies, all published between 1992 and 2016, included multiple countries like 30 samples from the US, four from Switzerland, three from Germany, two each from Australia, Belgium, Canada, Finland, Greece, Russia and Sweden.

Samples ranged from early childhood to late adulthood.

Self-esteem, Social Relationship, Support, Acceptance
Low self esteem restricts you from recognizing your potential and living your life to the fullest. Pixabay

The authors found that positive social relationships, social support and social acceptance help shape the development of self-esteem in people over time across ages four to 76.

They also found a significant effect in the reverse direction.

ALSO READ: Excess Physical Activity Results in Fatigue and Reduced Performance

While earlier research had yielded inconsistent findings, the meta-analysis supports the classic and contemporary theories of the influence of self-esteem on social connections and the influence of social connections on self-esteem, said the researchers.

The findings were the same after accounting for gender and ethnicity. (IANS)

STAY CONNECTED

19,143FansLike
362FollowersFollow
1,775FollowersFollow

Most Popular

Microsoft Study Shows Pandemic has Increased Feeling of Burnout Among Workers

If you've been feeling overwhelmed at work lately, you are not alone as a new Microsoft study has shown that the pandemic has increased...

Lower Zinc Levels in Blood Linked to Higher Death Risk in Covid Patients: Study

In a major study, researchers have found that having a lower level of zinc in the blood is associated with a poorer outcome in...

Time Magazine List of 100 Most Influential People: Ayushmann Khurrana Among 5 Indians

Indian actor Ayushmann Khurrana is in the Time magazine list of 100 Most Influential People this year. Follow NewsGram on LinkedIn to know what's happening...

Return to Usual Sexual Activity After Heart Attack for Long-Term Survival

Returning to usual levels of sexual activity within a few months after a heart attack is positively associated with long-term survival, say researchers. According to...

Researchers Find Potential New Drug Candidate Against Enterovirus

Some good news in the search for antiviral drugs for hard-to-treat diseases as researchers have identified a potential new drug candidate against enterovirus 71,...

Stroke Patients With Covid-19 Show Increased Inflammation, Death Rate: Researchers

Stroke patients who also have Covid-19 showed increased systemic inflammation, more serious stroke severity and a much higher rate of death, compared to stroke...

Playing Video Games in Childhood Can Improve Working Memory Years Later

In a good news to video game lovers, researchers have found that playing video games as a child can improve working memory years later. The...

Know the Negative Impact of Covid-19 Lockdown on Kids

Children, who appear at a relatively lower risk from Covid-19, are disproportionately harmed by precautions involved with lockdowns, warn researchers. Experts from Oxford University Hospitals...

Recent Comments