Wednesday October 16, 2019

Now It’s Possible to Recover from Type 2 Diabetes with Weight Loss

These interventions can be very challenging to individuals and difficult to achieve

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Recover, Diabetes, Weight Loss
We've known for some time now that it's possible to send diabetes into remission using fairly drastic measures such as intensive weight loss programmes and extreme calorie restriction. Pixabay

People who achieve weight loss of 10 per cent or more in the first five years after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have the greatest chance of seeing their disease go into remission, says a study.

The findings, published in the journal Diabetic Medicine, suggest that it is possible to recover from the disease without intensive lifestyle interventions or extreme calorie restrictions.

“We’ve known for some time now that it’s possible to send diabetes into remission using fairly drastic measures such as intensive weight loss programmes and extreme calorie restriction,” said study researcher Hajira Dambha-Miller from the University of Cambridge.

“These interventions can be very challenging to individuals and difficult to achieve. But, our results suggest that it may be possible to get rid of diabetes, for at least five years, with a more modest weight loss of 10 per cent,” Dambha-Miller said.

Recover, Diabetes, Weight Loss
The findings, published in the journal Diabetic Medicine, suggest that it is possible to recover from the disease without intensive lifestyle interventions or extreme calorie restrictions. Pixabay

Type 2 diabetes affects 400 million people worldwide and increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, blindness and amputations.

While the disease can be managed through a combination of positive lifestyle changes and medication, it is also possible for the high blood glucose levels that define diabetes to return to normal – through significant calorie restriction and weight loss.

An intensive low-calorie diet involving a total daily intake of 700 calories for eight weeks has been associated with remission in almost nine out of ten people with recently diagnosed diabetes and in half of the people with longstanding disease.

For the findings, the research team studied data from the ADDITION-Cambridge trial, a prospective cohort study of 867 people with newly diagnosed diabetes aged 40 and 69 years recruited from general practices in the eastern region.

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The researchers found that 257 participants were in remission at five-year follow-up.

People who achieved weight loss of 10 per cent or more within the first five years after diagnosis were more than twice as likely to go into remission compared to people who maintained the same weight.

In order to clarify the best way to help patients with type 2 diabetes achieve sustained weight loss, the team is currently undertaking a study called GLoW (Glucose Lowering through Weight management). (IANS)

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Rotavirus Relates to Development of Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers suggests that Rotavirus infection might play a role in the generation of Type 1 Diabetes

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Diabetes
Rotavirus vaccination can contribute to the primary prevention of Type 1 Diabetes. Pixabay

Researchers from the University of Melbourne have found that rotavirus infection might play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes.

Rotavirus remains the major cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide, although the advent of vaccination has substantially decreased associated mortality.

Following the recent introduction of rotavirus vaccination, there has been a 15 per cent decrease in the incidence of type 1 diabetes in Australian children under four years of age.

“Vaccination against rotavirus may have the additional benefit in some children of being a primary prevention for type 1 diabetes,” said the study’s lead author Leonard C. Harrison.

Diabetes
The recent introduction of rotavirus vaccination, there has been a 15 per cent decrease in the incidence of type 1 Diabetes in Australian children. Pixabay

The study published in the journal PLOS suggested that rotavirus vaccination could contribute to the primary prevention of this autoimmune disease.

This finding complements human and animal studies implicating rotavirus in the development of type 1 diabetes in genetically susceptible children.

In the article, the research team begin by reviewing molecular evidence supporting their hypothesis and point out the association between rotavirus infection and serum islet autoantibodies.

Diabetes
Rotavirus infection might play a role in the development of type 1 Diabetes. Pixabay

The results showed that rotavirus infection-induced pancreatic pathology, as well as environmental factors that promote the rise in the incidence of type 1 diabetes.

After reviewing population-level data, the study suggested that rotavirus vaccination might be associated with a decrease in the incidence of type 1 diabetes.

According to the researchers, it will be important to identify which children are most likely to be protected by rotavirus vaccination.

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Moreover, future studies should aim to reveal disease mechanisms and directly demonstrate whether rotavirus infects human pancreas prior to the onset of islet autoimmunity or type 1 diabetes. (IANS)