Friday December 14, 2018

‘Power paper’ to store electricity soon

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London: Researchers at Linkoping University in Sweden have developed a ‘power paper’ that can store energy. The material consists of nanocellulose and a conductive polymer.

Unlike the batteries and capacitors currently on the market, power paper is produced from simple materials like renewable cellulose and an easily available polymer.

It is light in weight, requires no dangerous chemicals or heavy metals and it is waterproof.

One sheet of this new material, 15 cm in diameter and a few tenths of a millimetre thick, can store as much as 1F, which is similar to the supercapacitors currently on the market.

The material can be recharged hundreds of times and each charge only takes a few seconds.

“Thin films that function as capacitors have existed for some time. What we have done is to produce the material in three dimensions. We can produce thick sheets,” said study co-author professor Xavier Crispin.

The material, power paper, looks and feels like a slightly plastic paper.

The structural foundation of the material is nanocellulose, which is cellulose fibres which, using high-pressure water, are broken down into fibres as thin as 20 nm in diametre.

With the cellulose fibres in a solution of water, an electrically charged polymer, also in a water solution, is added. The polymer then forms a thin coating around the fibres.

“The covered fibres are in tangles, where the liquid in the spaces between them functions as an electrolyte,” explained researcher Jesper Edberg.

The new cellulose-polymer material has set a new world record in simultaneous conductivity for ions and electrons, which explains its exceptional capacity for energy storage.

The study was published in the journal Advanced Science.(ians)

(picture credit:cdn.ndtv.com)

 

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Microsoft completes renewable energy deal for Bengaluru facility

This deal is part of the Karnataka government's programme to encourage investments in local solar energy operations

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Microsoft's new Surface products include 1st-ever headphones. Wikimedia Commons
  • Microsoft completed its first renewable energy deal in India
  • The deal took place in Bengaluru
  • The deal took place to encourage investments in local solar energy operations

Microsoft on Tuesday said it completed its first renewable energy deal in India which will help power its new office building here with solar power.

As part of the deal, the tech giant will purchase three megawatts of solar-powered electricity from Bengaluru-based renewable power producer Atria Power.

The deal took place in India's IT hub, Bengaluru.
The deal took place in India’s IT hub, Bengaluru.

This will meet 80 percent of the projected electricity needs at the new facility, Microsoft said.

“Investing in local solar energy to help power our new Bengaluru office building is good for Microsoft, good for India and good for the environment,” said Anant Maheshwari, President.

This deal is part of the Karnataka government’s programme to encourage investments in local solar energy operations, and in line with the larger Indian government goal to ramp up solar power generation to 100 gigawatts by 2022.

Also Read: Microsoft’s Dublin office comes up with LED waterfall and digital lake

“We are proud to be deepening our long history of partnership and investment in India with this agreement. This deal will help us grow sustainably and supports the growth of the Indian solar energy industry, so that the entire country can more easily and reliably access clean electricity,” Maheshwari added.

This is Microsoft’s first solar energy agreement in India, and one of the first in Asia — the company completed a new solar agreement in Singapore last week.

This deal is a part of encouraging use of renewable energy. Pixabay
This deal is a part of encouraging the use of renewable energy. Pixabay

Once completed, this project will bring MS’s total global direct procurement in renewable energy projects to nearly 900 megawatts.

“Microsoft, like India, has ambitious commitments to use more renewable energy,” said Rob Bernard, Chief Environmental Strategist, Microsoft. IANS