Monday December 16, 2019

Pre-Schoolers with Symptoms of ADHD Take More Time to Be School-Ready

We were pretty surprised at the proportion of kids within the ADHD group who were not school-ready

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It was found that 79 per cent of the children with ADHD had impaired school readiness compared with 13 per cent of children in the control group. Pixabay

Researchers have found that pre-schoolers with symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are much less likely to be ready for school, compared to other children of the same age.

The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, included 93 children — 45 children with ADHD and 48 without the condition. Aged between 4-5 years, nearly all had attended or were currently enrolled in preschool and some were enrolled in kindergarten.

It was found that 79 per cent of the children with ADHD had impaired school readiness compared with 13 per cent of children in the control group.

“We were pretty surprised at the proportion of kids within the ADHD group who were not school-ready, it’s a really high number,” said Irene Loe, Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the US.

ADHD, Pre-Schoolers, School
Researchers have found that pre-schoolers with symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are much less likely to be ready for school, compared to other children of the same age. Pixabay

“A lot of these kids are not identified until they’re really having a lot of trouble in the school setting,” Loe said.

For the study, researchers conducted tests and administered parent questionnaires to measure five areas of the children’s functioning: physical well-being and motor development; social and emotional development; approaches to learning; language development; and cognition and general knowledge.

According to the study, kids with ADHD were not more likely than their peers to show impairment in the area of cognition and general knowledge.

But children with ADHD were much more likely than their peers to struggle in all the four other areas measured.

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They were 73 times more likely than children without ADHD to be impaired in approaches to learning; more than seven times as likely to have impaired social and emotional development; six times as likely to have impaired language development; and three times as likely to have impaired physical well-being and motor development.

The findings suggest that identifying and helping kids with significant levels of ADHD symptoms could reduce their struggles in elementary school. (IANS)

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Students with Higher Emotional Intelligence Better Academic Performance

Emotionally intelligent students get better grades

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Emotional intelligence
A student needs to learn to manage his/her emotions in order to get better grades. Lifetime Stock

It’s not enough to be smart and hardworking and students must also be able to understand and manage their emotions — a skill known as emotional intelligence — to do better at school than their less skilled peers as measured by test scores, says a study.

The concept of emotional intelligence as an area of academic research is relatively new but there is evidence that social and emotional learning programmes in schools are effective at improving academic performance.

“Although we know that high intelligence and a conscientious personality are the most important psychological traits necessary for academic success, our research highlights a third factor, emotional intelligence, that may also help students succeed,” said Carolyn MacCann from University of Sydney.

MacCann and her colleagues analyzed data from more than 160 studies, representing more than 42,000 students from 27 countries, published between 1998 and 2019.

Emotional Intelligence
Students who are emotionally intelligent may be better able to manage negative emotions. Lifetime Stock

More than 76 per cent were from English-speaking countries and the students ranged in age from elementary school to college.

The researchers found that students with higher emotional intelligence tended to get higher grades and better achievement test scores than those with lower emotional intelligence scores.

What was most surprising to the researchers was the association held regardless of age, said the study published in the journal Psychological Bulletin.

As for why emotional intelligence can affect academic performance, MacCann believes a number of factors may come into play.

“Students with higher emotional intelligence may be better able to manage negative emotions, such as anxiety, boredom and disappointment, that can negatively affect academic performance,” she said.

“Also, these students may be better able to manage the social world around them, forming better relationships with teachers, peers and family, all of which are important to academic success.”

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MacCann cautions against widespread testing of students to identify and target those with low emotional intelligence as it may stigmatize those students.

Instead, she recommends interventions that involve the whole school, including additional teacher training and a focus on teacher well-being and emotional skills. (IANS)