Monday September 16, 2019

Pre-term Birth Impact Baby’s Love Life in Adulthood, Says New Study

“Young adults born preterm might experience social challenges in their life, which might affect their romantic relationships and family plannings” he added

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A teenager caressing the newborn. Pixabay

Researchers have found that babies who were born pre-term are less likely to form romantic relationships, have sexual relations or experience parenthood than those who were born full term, a new study shoes.

According to a recent report by the World Health Organisation (WHO), India is the leading country of preterm births where babies are born before completed 37 weeks of gestation and this number is rising.

Published in the journal JAMA Network Open, the study shows in the analysis of 4.4 million participants those born pre-term were 28 per cent less likely to form romantic relationships and 22 per cent less likely to become parents, when compared to those born full term.

“It is partly due to pre-term birth being associated with being more often withdrawn and shy, socially excluded and less likely to take risks in adolescence,” said researchers from the University of Warwick.

“The finding that adults who were born pre-term are less likely to have a partner, to have sex and become parents does not appear to be explained by a higher rate of disability. Rather preterm-born children have been previously found to have poorer social interactions in childhood that make it harder for them to master social transitions such as finding a partner, which in turn is proven to boost your wellbeing,” said the study lead author Marina Goulart de Mendonca from the University of Warwick.

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A Venezuelan migrant woman holds a baby outside an immigration processing office on the Rumichaca bridge after crossing the border from Colombia to Rumichaca, Ecuador, June 12, 2019 (Representational image). VOA

More needs to be done in schools and by parents to encourage social interactions at younger ages, so when they transition to adulthood they are more likely to meet someone and increase their wellbeing, said the experts.

According to Amit Garg, Consultant Psychiatrist, Sri Balaji Action Medical Institute in Delhi, the hardships followed by premature babies while growing up are indescribable.

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“Getting birth before due time not only affects their physical growth but mental growth also and that is for lifetime in some cases. A study says preterm babies are tending to be unromantic during young age, One should be very careful about nutrition and other related illness also so that good health can be maintained,” Garg told IANS.

“Young adults born preterm might experience social challenges in their life, which might affect their romantic relationships and family plannings” he added. (IANS)

Next Story

U.N. Agencies Urging Governments to Encourage Mothers to Breastfeed Their Babies

The World Health Organization and U.N. Children’s Fund say breastfed babies have the best chance of enjoying a healthy, productive life

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FILE - Some 170 mothers breastfeed their children during a mass breastfeeding event inside a military headquarters in Taguig City, metro Manila, August 2, 2014. VOA

Leading U.N. agencies are urging governments to adopt family-friendly policies to encourage mothers to breastfeed their babies at home and at work. The World Health Organization and U.N. Children’s Fund say breastfed babies have the best chance of enjoying a healthy, productive life.

Health experts agree both mothers and babies reap tremendous benefits from breastfeeding. They say nursing mothers run lower risks of getting ovarian cancer, breast cancer and Type 2 diabetes.

For babies, there are both short-term and long-term benefits. They say mother’s milk supports healthy brain development in babies and boosts their immune systems so they can better fight off infections.

A U.N. survey finds wealthier countries have the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world, with fewer than 25 percent of babies being exclusively breastfed. This compares with Rwanda where nearly 90 percent of babies are breastfed and other countries such as Burundi and Sri Lanka, which have high rates of well over 80 percent.

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Leading U.N. agencies are urging governments to adopt family-friendly policies to encourage mothers to breastfeed their babies at home and at work. Pixabay

The technical officer in WHO’s nutrition department, Laurence Grummer-Strawn, tells VOA children in the richer countries would enjoy long-term benefits from breastfeeding.

“Babies who are breast fed are actually less likely to become obese when they are older children,” said Grummer-Strawn. “They have lower risks of SIDS or sudden infant death syndrome. They have lower risk of leukemia…And, in low income countries, it reduces risks of respiratory infections and diarrhea that are some of the big killers of children.”

WHO reports increasing breastfeeding could prevent 823,000 deaths in children under five every year and 20,000 annual deaths from breast cancer. Additionally, Grummer-Strawn says a World Bank analysis finds investing in increasing breastfeeding would produce huge returns.

“They estimated for every dollar that is spent to promote, protect and support breastfeeding, $35 would be saved in economic gains around the world,” said Grummer-Strawn. “The overall estimate is that on an annual basis, we lose $302 billion in global productivity because of the lack of breastfeeding.”

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WHO and UNICEF are calling on governments to support breastfeeding by enacting paid maternity leave for a minimum of 18 weeks; as well as paid paternity leave to encourage shared caring of children on an equal basis.
They say employers should support nursing mothers returning to work by providing them with a private, hygienic space for breastfeeding and expressing and storing milk. (VOA)