Monday April 22, 2019

Prenatal Fish Consumption NOT Linked to Autism Risk in Babies

The researchers also found poor social cognition if mothers ate no fish at all, especially for baby girls

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Fish is an excellent source of the omega-3s EPA and DHA while flax, walnuts and canola oil are good sources of ALA omega-3. Pixabay

Instead of increasing risk of autism, eating fish twice a week during pregnancy may actually give newborns several nutritional benefits, suggests a new research.

The findings — published in journal Molecular Autism — found no evidence to support claims that mercury in fish is linked to the development of autism or autistic traits in newborns.

“All species of fish contain traces of mercury, which can harm brain development, but we have found that the health benefits of fish, probably from nutrients such as vitamin D, Omega-3 fatty acids, selenium and iodine, outweigh the risks from mercury,” said co-author Caroline Taylor from the University of Bristol in Britain.

For the study, the researchers examined the assumption that mercury exposure during pregnancy is a major cause of autism, using evidence from nearly 4,500 women.

They analysed blood samples, reported fish consumption and gathered information on autism and autistic traits from one of the largest longitudinal studies to date.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

The researchers also found poor social cognition if mothers ate no fish at all, especially for baby girls.

“Our findings further endorse the safety of eating fish during pregnancy. Importantly, we’ve found no evidence at all to support claims that mercury is involved in the development of autism or autistic traits,” said lead author Jean Golding, Professor at the University of Bristol.

Also Read: Gene Responsible For Autism Identified

“This adds to a body of work that endorses eating of fish during pregnancy for a good nutritional start to life with at least two fish meals a week,” Golding noted. (IANS)

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Scientists Claim, Absence Of KDM5 Protein in Flies Causes Autism

The study, published in the journal Cell Host and Microbe, showed without the function of KDM5, the flies' intestinal mucosal barriers were damaged and their intestinal flora was imbalanced. 

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"Many people with autism also have a serious intestinal illness, like diarrhea and irritable-bowel syndrome. It is consistent with our findings," Liu said. Pixabay

 Chinese scientists have discovered that absence of a certain protein in flies causes intestinal flora imbalance and makes them show symptoms similar to autism in humans.

The team, led by Professor Liu Xingyin of Nanjing Medical University in China, said the discovery could lead to a new theoretical path of treating autism based on digestion and immune activities, the Xinhua reported.

Xingyin said the KDM5-deficient drosophila melanogaster, or vinegar flies, kept their distance from one another, were slow to respond and had reduced direct contact with other flies.

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Former studies about autism usually focused on genetics,” he said. “We are looking forward to opening a new road for human autism therapy from the perspective of human digestion and the immune system,” Liu said. Pixabay

“All of these phenomena are similar to the communication disorders of people with autism,” Liu said.

The study, published in the journal Cell Host and Microbe, showed without the function of KDM5, the flies’ intestinal mucosal barriers were damaged and their intestinal flora was imbalanced.

autism
The team, led by Professor Liu Xingyin of Nanjing Medical University in China, said the discovery could lead to a new theoretical path of treating autism based on digestion and immune activities, the Xinhua reported. Pixabay

“Many people with autism also have a serious intestinal illness, like diarrhea and irritable-bowel syndrome. It is consistent with our findings,” Liu said.

Also Read:High Level Of Insulin in Infants May Rise Chances Of Brain Damage
Further research also discovered that using antibiotics or feeding lactobacillus plantarum could improve social behaviour as well as the lifespan of some KDM5-deficient flies.

“Former studies about autism usually focused on genetics,” he said. “We are looking forward to opening a new road for human autism therapy from the perspective of human digestion and the immune system,” Liu said. (IANS)