Sunday January 20, 2019
Home India Preservative ...

Preservative Formalin having adverse impact on Human body found in 11 Fish samples in Agartala markets: Minister

0
//
Fisherman in India Wikimedia

Agartala, March 3, 2017: Preservative formalin having an adverse impact on human body was found in 11 fish samples in Agartala markets, which forced the Tripura government to take “severe action”.

“Following the media reports, the state health department officials collected 40 fish samples from Agartala and formalin was found in 11 samples,” Tripura Health Minister Badal Choudhury said in the Tripura assembly on Tuesday.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

Formalin, a poisonous and non-decomposing chemical agent, is used as an antiseptic, disinfectant and preservative in various items.

Replying to a calling attention notice, he told the assembly: “Officials have been asked to take severe legal action against the accused and wrongdoers.”

The calling attention notice was earlier jointly given by opposition Trinamool Congress lawmakers Ashish Saha and Pranjit Singh Roy.

The minister said of the 11 fish samples in which laboratory tests showed formalin was used, five samples were collected from two main fish markets of Agartala and six were collected from fish imported from Bangladesh.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

Choudhury said a massive awareness campaign was also undertaken against the use of formalin in eatable items.

“Food Safety Officers are collecting samples randomly from the open market and testing them in laboratories. Under the Food Safety Security Act and Rules, 2011, if anyone is found guilty, the defaulter may face a penalty of Rs 1 lakh to Rs 10 lakh or imprisonment or both,” the Health Minister warned.

The Tripura government has taken steps to appoint Food Safety Officer in each sub-division to ensure proper vigilance against food adulteration.

District Sessions Judges are designated to hear such cases and dispose them at the earliest, he added.

An official of the industries and commerce department said on an average, 25,644 kg fish are being daily imported from Bangladesh and 26,180 kg from outside the state, including Andhra Pradesh, in Tripura.

“These fish being imported from Bangladesh and other Indian states are being sold in Tripura markets without any laboratory tests,” the official told IANS on condition of anonymity. (IANS)

Next Story

Human Body May Not Cope With Evening Stress, Study Reveals

The team first measured the diurnal rhythm of salivary cortisol levels from the volunteers and then exposed one group to stress test in the morning, and another to the evening

0
stress
Your body may not cope with evening stress: Study. Pixabay

Human bodies which experience stress in the evening release less cortisol — the primary stress hormone in humans — compared to stressful events in the morning, and thus may pose vulnerabilities, according to a new research.

The study, led by medical physiologist Yujiro Yamanaka at Japan’s Hokkaido University, the body’s central system reacts less strongly to acute psychological stress in the evening than it does in the morning, suggesting possible vulnerability to stressful events in the evening.

“Our study suggests a possible vulnerability to stress in the evening. However, it is important to take into account each individual’s unique biological clock and the time of day when assessing the response to stressors and preventing them,” Yamanaka commented.

The study, published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology Reports, explored a small group of young and healthy volunteers with normal work hours and sleep habits to find out if the “hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal” (HPA) axis responds differently to acute psychological stress according to the time of day.

The HPA axis connects the central nervous and endocrine systems of the body. Cortisol is released for several hours when the HPA axis is activated by a stressful event.

stress
Representational image. Pixabay

This helps provide the body with energy in the face of a perceived need for fight or flight. Cortisol levels are also regulated by a master circadian clock in the brain and are normally high in the morning and low in the evening.

The team first measured the diurnal rhythm of salivary cortisol levels from the volunteers and then exposed one group to stress test in the morning, and another to the evening.

Also Read- Millions Of Urban Children Worse Than Rural People: UNICEF

The researchers found that salivary cortisol levels increased significantly in the volunteers that took the stress test in the morning while no such response was observed in those that took the test in the evening.

“Our body can respond to the morning stress event by activating the HPA axis and sympathetic nervous system, but it needs to respond to evening stress event by activating the sympathetic nervous system only,” Yamanaka said. (IANS)