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Preventing the development of Hypertension, Obesity and Diabetes in Mid-life is Necessary to Lower Heart Failure Risk

People without diabetes lived on average between 8.6 and 10.6 years longer without heart failure

Representational Image. Pixabay

New York, November 29, 2016: Preventing the development of hypertension, obesity and diabetes in mid-life — between the age of 45 and 55 years — can result in an 86 per cent lower risk of heart failure throughout the remainder of life, says a research.

Millions of people worldwide currently suffer from heart failure as well as face a significantly reduced quality of life and higher mortality rate.

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The study found that hypertension, obesity and diabetes — major risk factors as well as highly prevalent in individuals — are preventable risk factors for heart failure, the researchers said.

Further, people with diabetes were found to have a particularly strong association with shorter heart failure-free survival, as those without diabetes lived on average between 8.6 and 10.6 years longer without heart failure.

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Men at age 45 years without any of the three risk factors lived an average of 10.6 years longer free of heart failure, while women at age 45 without any of the three risk factors lived an average of 14.9 years longer without heart failure.

“The study adds to the understanding of how individual and aggregate risk factor levels, specifically in middle age, affect incident heart failure risk over the remaining lifespan,” said John T. Wilkins from the Northwestern University at Evanston, in Illinois, in the US.

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Prevention of hypertension, obesity and diabetes by ages 45 and 55 years may substantially prolong heart failure-free survival, decrease heart failure-related morbidity and reduce the public health impact of heart failure, the researchers noted.

The study was published in the journal JACC: Heart Failure. (IANS)

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Can Bariatric Surgery Prevent Kidney Disease?

Bariatric Surgery
For the study, published in the International Journal of Obesity, over 4,000 patients aged 37-60 years with obesity were followed for more than 20 years. Pixabay

Undergoing bariatric surgery may significantly lower the risk of developing severe chronic kidney disease and kidney failure, according to a study.

Obesity is a dangerous condition and goes hand in hand with elevated blood pressure, cardiovascular diseases and Type-2 diabetes, which in turn may lead to complications such as chronic kidney disease.

Obesity is also an independent risk factor in developing chronic kidney disease. Different obesity treatment strategies include lifestyle interventions, dietary modification, pharmacological and surgical treatment.

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Bariatric Surgery
Half of the patients received weight-loss surgery, and the other half were treated with conventional non-surgical methods in the primary health care. Pixabay

The findings showed that patients with evidence of kidney damage — high levels of protein in the urine — benefited most from surgical treatment, indicating that surgery prevents progression of pre-existing kidney injury towards renal failure.

“The study reported long-term effects of bariatric surgery compared to usual obesity care on incidence of end-stage renal disease alone and in combination with chronic kidney disease stage 4,” said A. Shulman, from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

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These results add to a large body of evidence which demonstrates that bariatric surgery, reduces mortality, improves type 2 diabetes and prevents cardiovascular disease and cancer, the researchers added. IANS