Wednesday June 26, 2019

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes With The Help of Weight Loss

How weight loss can help stop Type-2 diabetes

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Weight Loss
Here's the secret to maintaining weight loss. Pixabay

Losing weight can lead to an early and sustained improvement in the functioning of pancreatic beta cells, which can help individuals with Type-2 diabetes to achieve remission, a study has found.

The findings suggest that weight loss normalizes fat metabolism in all individuals with Type-2 diabetes, but the more rapid loss of the capacity of beta cells to recover prevents some individuals from returning to a non-diabetic state.

“The knowledge of reversibility of Type-2 diabetes, ultimately due to re-differentiation of pancreatic beta cells, will lead to further targeted work to improve understanding of this process. This provides a major focus for cell biologists to make specific advances,” said Roy Taylor of Newcastle University in the UK.

“At present, the early management of Type-2 diabetes tends to involve a period of adjusting to the diagnosis plus pharmacotherapy with lifestyle changes, which in practice are modest. Our data suggest that substantial weight loss at the time of diagnosis is appropriate to rescue the beta cells,” he added.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

In a clinical trial conducted recently, nearly half of the individuals with Type-2 diabetes achieved remission to a non-diabetic state after a weight-loss intervention delivered within six years of diagnosis.

The study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism, reveals that this successful response to weight loss is associated with the early and sustained improvement in the functioning of pancreatic beta cells. This finding challenges the previous paradigm that beta-cell function is irreversibly lost in patients with Type-2 diabetes.

Some non-responders simply had not lost enough weight, but in those who had, it was not clear how their response differed from that of responders.

Also Read: Eating Fresh Fruits Everyday May Keep Diabetes at Bay

To find out, the team examined liver fat content, pancreatic fat content, blood concentrations of fats called triglycerides, and beta-cell function and found both groups lost these metabolic factors.

However, only the responders demonstrated early and sustained improvement in beta-cell function. Pancreatic beta cells secrete insulin in two phases in response to an increase in blood glucose concentration, the researchers noted. (IANS)

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Prostrate Medicines Likely to Increase Risk of Type-2 Diabetes

For the study, the team studied health records from around 55,000 men who were prescribed 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors

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check-up for diabetes
Check-up for Diabetes. Pixabay

Medicines prescribed to reduce the symptoms of prostate diseases increase the likelihood of developing Type-2 diabetes.

A study found that the drugs increased the risk of developing the disorder by about 30 per cent. In addition, a similar effect was seen when repeated with health records from a group of Taiwanese men.

Men with enlarged prostates are commonly prescribed the drugs called 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors that reduce the production of hormones called androgens. These help treat symptoms such as reduced urinary flow.

The study’s findings suggested that men taking these medications may need additional health checks to monitor warning signs of diabetes so that their prescriptions can be altered if necessary.

Representational image.

“We found that commonly prescribed medications for prostate disease can increase the risk of Type-2 diabetes. These findings will be particularly important for health screening in older men who are already typically at a higher risk of Type-2 diabetes,” said Ruth Andrew, Professor at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

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“It is important that all patients are made aware of the risks and benefits of their medications,” noted Li Wei, Associate Professor at the UCL School of Pharmacy in Britain.

For the study, the team studied health records from around 55,000 men who were prescribed 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors. (IANS)