Monday October 22, 2018

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes With The Help of Weight Loss

How weight loss can help stop Type-2 diabetes

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Weight Loss
The study, published in the journal Diabetes, observed a significantly altered eating behaviour in overweight animals. Pixabay
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Losing weight can lead to an early and sustained improvement in the functioning of pancreatic beta cells, which can help individuals with Type-2 diabetes to achieve remission, a study has found.

The findings suggest that weight loss normalizes fat metabolism in all individuals with Type-2 diabetes, but the more rapid loss of the capacity of beta cells to recover prevents some individuals from returning to a non-diabetic state.

“The knowledge of reversibility of Type-2 diabetes, ultimately due to re-differentiation of pancreatic beta cells, will lead to further targeted work to improve understanding of this process. This provides a major focus for cell biologists to make specific advances,” said Roy Taylor of Newcastle University in the UK.

“At present, the early management of Type-2 diabetes tends to involve a period of adjusting to the diagnosis plus pharmacotherapy with lifestyle changes, which in practice are modest. Our data suggest that substantial weight loss at the time of diagnosis is appropriate to rescue the beta cells,” he added.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

In a clinical trial conducted recently, nearly half of the individuals with Type-2 diabetes achieved remission to a non-diabetic state after a weight-loss intervention delivered within six years of diagnosis.

The study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism, reveals that this successful response to weight loss is associated with the early and sustained improvement in the functioning of pancreatic beta cells. This finding challenges the previous paradigm that beta-cell function is irreversibly lost in patients with Type-2 diabetes.

Some non-responders simply had not lost enough weight, but in those who had, it was not clear how their response differed from that of responders.

Also Read: Eating Fresh Fruits Everyday May Keep Diabetes at Bay

To find out, the team examined liver fat content, pancreatic fat content, blood concentrations of fats called triglycerides, and beta-cell function and found both groups lost these metabolic factors.

However, only the responders demonstrated early and sustained improvement in beta-cell function. Pancreatic beta cells secrete insulin in two phases in response to an increase in blood glucose concentration, the researchers noted. (IANS)

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Losing Weight Can Help Lower The Risk of Breast Cancer For Post-menopausal Women

"These findings, taken together, provide strong correlative evidence that a modest weight loss programme can impact breast cancer,"

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Photo: neqotkukhealthcenter.ca

Women, please take a note. Losing weight can help lower the risk of developing breast cancer in the post-menopausal stage, a new study has found.

The study, published in the journal CANCER, found that among post-menopausal women, participants who lost weight had a lower risk of developing invasive breast cancer than those who maintained or gained weight.

“Our study indicates that moderate, relatively short-term weight reduction was associated with a statistically significant reduction in breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women,” said co-author Rowan Chlebowski from the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California.

Although obesity has been strongly related to breast cancer risk, studies examining whether weight loss might reduce postmenopausal women’s risk have provided mixed results, the researchers said.

For the study, the research team analysed information on 61,335 women participating in the World Health Initiative Observational Study who had no prior history of breast cancer and had normal mammogram results.

Breast Cancer
Weight loss may lower breast cancer risk for post-menopausal women. Pixabay

The participant’s body weight, height and body mass index were assessed at the start of the study and again three years later.

The team found that during an average follow-up of 11.4 years, there were 3,061 new cases of invasive breast cancer diagnosed.

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“These are observational results, but they are also supported by randomised clinical trial evidence from the Women’s Health Initiative Dietary Modification trial where, in a randomised clinical trial setting, adopting a low-fat dietary pattern that was associated with a similar magnitude of weight loss resulted in a significant improvement in breast cancer overall survival,” Chlebowski said.

“These findings, taken together, provide strong correlative evidence that a modest weight loss programme can impact breast cancer,” he noted. (IANS)