Thursday February 21, 2019

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes With The Help of Weight Loss

How weight loss can help stop Type-2 diabetes

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Weight Loss
Here's the secret to maintaining weight loss. Pixabay

Losing weight can lead to an early and sustained improvement in the functioning of pancreatic beta cells, which can help individuals with Type-2 diabetes to achieve remission, a study has found.

The findings suggest that weight loss normalizes fat metabolism in all individuals with Type-2 diabetes, but the more rapid loss of the capacity of beta cells to recover prevents some individuals from returning to a non-diabetic state.

“The knowledge of reversibility of Type-2 diabetes, ultimately due to re-differentiation of pancreatic beta cells, will lead to further targeted work to improve understanding of this process. This provides a major focus for cell biologists to make specific advances,” said Roy Taylor of Newcastle University in the UK.

“At present, the early management of Type-2 diabetes tends to involve a period of adjusting to the diagnosis plus pharmacotherapy with lifestyle changes, which in practice are modest. Our data suggest that substantial weight loss at the time of diagnosis is appropriate to rescue the beta cells,” he added.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

In a clinical trial conducted recently, nearly half of the individuals with Type-2 diabetes achieved remission to a non-diabetic state after a weight-loss intervention delivered within six years of diagnosis.

The study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism, reveals that this successful response to weight loss is associated with the early and sustained improvement in the functioning of pancreatic beta cells. This finding challenges the previous paradigm that beta-cell function is irreversibly lost in patients with Type-2 diabetes.

Some non-responders simply had not lost enough weight, but in those who had, it was not clear how their response differed from that of responders.

Also Read: Eating Fresh Fruits Everyday May Keep Diabetes at Bay

To find out, the team examined liver fat content, pancreatic fat content, blood concentrations of fats called triglycerides, and beta-cell function and found both groups lost these metabolic factors.

However, only the responders demonstrated early and sustained improvement in beta-cell function. Pancreatic beta cells secrete insulin in two phases in response to an increase in blood glucose concentration, the researchers noted. (IANS)

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Secret of Maintaining Weight Loss

At the same average body weight, participants who consumed the low-carb diet burned about 250 kilocalories a day more than those on the high-carb diet

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Weight Loss
Here's the secret to maintaining weight loss. Pixabay

Staying in shape is no mean job as people often find that they quickly regain the weight that they had shed after a rigorous regime of dieting or exercise. Eating a diet low on carbohydrates may, however, help them maintain weight loss, new research has found.

This is because eating fewer carbohydrates increases the number of calories burned, said the study published in the journal BMJ.

For the study, the researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital in the US enrolled 234 overweight adults aged between 18 and 65 to an initial weight-loss diet for about 10 weeks.

Body Positivity is not only about feeling good about our own body type but also appreciating other body types as well. Pixabay
Representational image. Pixabay
 Of these, 164 achieved the goal of losing 10 to 14 per cent of body weight.

The participants were then randomised to follow high, moderate or low-carbohydrate diets for an additional 20 weeks with carbs comprising 60, 40 and 20 per cent of total calories, respectively.

The results showed that over the 20 weeks, calories burned was significantly greater on the low-carbohydrate diet versus the high-carbohydrate diet.

Also Read- Shutdown Called in Kerala After Two Women Claimed To Have Entered in Sabarimala Temple

At the same average body weight, participants who consumed the low-carb diet burned about 250 kilocalories a day more than those on the high-carb diet.

“If this difference persists – and we saw no drop-off during the 20 weeks of our study – the effect would translate into about a 20-pound weight loss after three years, with no change in calorie intake,” said Cara Ebbeling from Boston Children’s Hospital. (IANS)